I reported a woman staying with my Dad (83) for elder financial abuse and they treated me like a criminal. Who else do I go to? - AgingCare.com

I reported a woman staying with my Dad (83) for elder financial abuse and they treated me like a criminal. Who else do I go to?

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I went thru the motions to report her. She moved in with dad after they met in a parking lot. I did a back ground check on her & she has many alias's, many addresses & a few court cases & no work history. She is slowing taking over my dad's life, place he live's and she is not paying rent. They are not a couple though I sense she may be a prostitute in hiding. She keeps her corvette hidden at my dad's place & drives his car. She informed my brother she pays rent...which my dad says she does not. And she said when he dies she get's to live in his home. I tried to get help but they have treated me like a criminal. I am in Kentucky, my dad is in Carlsbad California. My brother lives there..but this woman has turned my dad against my brother & my dad wil not speak to him. My brother has his name on my dad's accounts & property.

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If dad is mentally competent- nothing. If dad is unable to pay his bills- you can request a poa against dads wishes and of course he will hate you. I would ask dad to lunch, show him what info you collected in writing- not just verbal accusations and tell him you are concerned for him. So long as he is able the legal system sees a jealous daughter and a family matter. Good luck to you.
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I have found this site very helpful and his main offices are in CA. bennettblummd
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In what way were you treated like a criminal?
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I'm willing to be the Corvette is stolen too. Get the VIN# and check it out.
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Good point Ferris! If the laws involved she'll probably run fast in the other direction..
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Then have your brother in CA change the accounts to require two signatures on any checks. Cancel any debit cards (if he can) and then have your brother file for an Order of Protection for your father against this woman and when he presents all the evidence to the Court, let your father's live-in come to court and present all her evidence she has. I'll bet if the legal system is involved she will lose interest in this elder and try for another. Good luck! (Oh, have your father evaluated for dementia too!)
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If your brother's name is on the property things may get ugly for your brother if she cons your dad into getting a loan against the property, that is if they co-own the property. Long ago when my mother lived on her own a distant cousin showed up, first he wanted to move in, then he proposed for my mother to take out a second mortgage against the property, supposedly so they could go away and travel, thankfully my mother said no though she was estranged from both my brother and myself at the time. When she finally asked for help because she knew she wasn't herself i made sure I had a durable POA signed by her. I would hire a local attorney to find out what legal action I could take against the woman and let the attorney have a talk with her. If she's broken the law on the past, this may help to get her out.
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Ask you brother to close all the accounts. If his name is on them, he is considered a co-owner and can do that. Open new accounts without dad's name. Or leave a very small amount in dad's account that He can get to. Since, you can still talk to dad, explain what is happening and that it is for his protection.

I would also call the local authorities. If she has many alias' as you said, they may be looking for her. Start documenting everything that you know to be fact and keep at the authorities for elder care abuse. Is there another family member that lives closer. A sibling or cousin, that could check on dad.

This woman suggests that she can live in his home after he dies. I don't believe that unless your dad's part of the house is left to her, she would have any choice. I would try to make sure that dad does not sign anything, but it seems like this woman may have quite a bit of experience at manipulation.

I hope someone will listen and be able to help your father.
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Red, we had a case of financial elder-abuse with my mother's caregiver. She embezzled $23,000 from my mother's bank account. Fortunately for us, she left evidence (checks she had written for cash, etc.). I threatened her with exposure and she actually paid it back over a period of six months. She had cancer and I didn't press charges. All our situations are different, but financial abuse seems to be rampant. I would get (or get your brother to do so) a local attorney. Perhaps he or she can write her a letter that would make it clear that you know her history and are about to bring charges, which would hopefully scare her into leaving. If not, the lawyer can advise you where to go from there. A lawyer would know the ins and outs about your brother's financial interest and control in the property. The fees might be well worth it! Good luck. A financial or other POA would be a wise thing to investigate, too, per "Give a Hug's" suggestion.
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If your brother's name is on the property, what is the situation that your dad lives under? Is he living there free of charge? Is he a renter? The reason I ask is that I wonder if there's a way to claim that only your dad is allowed to live there and to have the sheriff throw her out.

Sometimes, I think that rental agreements state things like this -- that the renter can't have guests or certain types of guests. But when it's your brother's name on the property, I wonder if he can actually just state that he's not going to allow this woman to live there.

I don't know any of this for a fact -- just thinking "out loud" based on other things. You'd definitely have to ask a lawyer and/or the sheriff, but it's worth looking into.

How is your dad's mental health? Is it time to get a financial POA over your dad? I'm not saying that it is, because falling prey to con artists doesn't mean a person is actually senile, but am just asking if that's the situation.
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