How to remove an elderly person from an unsafe home? - AgingCare.com

How to remove an elderly person from an unsafe home?

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Elderly person lives at home and cares for self. Extreme hoarding has created an unsafe, unclean living environment. Behavior is extreme and unpredictable. APS completed an in home assessment but nothing was done. Can daughter, who has both financial and medical POA, remove father and place in a facility which meets his mental health needs?

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Thank you all! Very helpful :)
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Just sayin' sometimes a loved one can be convinced you have more authority or that someone else (i.e., a doctor) has more authority than they have. Then they can be 'nudged' to cooperate in making a move that is good for them, bc they believe the 'authority' can make things happen. I know; I hate deceit, but ... I told Dad that he couldn't stay in his home, bc SOMEONE would call APS, and once they're involved, everything is out of his and my hands. The only way I could help him was to take him out of the house myself. I couldn't be there f/t, and I couldn't find/afford good, reliable help, and I truly believe that if I had left him there at the time, and made my 3X visits per week, I'd be visiting his grave now instead.
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I suspect that the outcome with APs depends on where you are located, who is in charge, their experience, etc. I know that from what I have seen in my state, APS and CPS seems to get involved and intervene, often asking for guardianship to make proper decisions. Some of the cases aren't even that clear cut. Oh well.....maybe, some places just have more resources.
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I'm always amazed at how bad things can be with regard to hoarded environments and APS feeling that the patient is "safe". As long as there is a clear path and heat vents are accessible and ovens/stoves aren't covered--they tend to turn a blind eye.

Getting an attorney on board and having the person declared incompetent is a more likely scenario to effecting a move. Even then, it's really hard. You do need at least one dr to sign off--and I can't think my dr would take time from her day to investigate--really, it takes a village of concerned individuals to make someone move from an unsafe environment to a safe one.

Yes, the daughter can work on getting this parent moved, but it will be hard. As the daughter of a mini-hoarder, I can't even imagine trying to pry mother free of her beloved junk. We did it once when she was forced to leave her "big house" and had to suffer her rage and anger for a couple years as she kept remembering stuff we couldn't keep. No worries. She's hoarded up the new place pretty well.

Also, call APS again. Maybe a fresher pair of eyes, with you trotting around WITH them may help. I don't know. Something bad will happen--just a matter of time.
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I might consult with an attorney in their jurisdiction to see what options there are and to review her paperwork to confirm they are in order. She may have authority based on the documents. There are ways to handle things, in those types of situation, but, it's challenging. It might require a lot of time, energy and attention to get things on the right course. And then there is the option of filing for Guardianship. The attorney can explain how that works and if she has enough evidence to win in court. I would also try to work with the doctor. I would hope the doctor is on board with getting the person some help.

Maybe, adult protective services didn't have all the evidence they need.  I'm not sure what happened, but, if he is a danger, I'd seek legal advice on how to proced in order to protect him. 
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