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I'm trying to figure out what is going on with my 92 y/o Grandma since she can't or won't tell me. Over the last 8 months or so, she has been making more groaning and whimpering sounds. She denies anything to be wrong and says the sounds are soothing to her. In January, she started making these sounds in the middle of the night. I told her everynight for a week in February that she needs to stop making these sounds during the night because it keeps everyone awake. I told her that if she keeps me awake, I would most likely be too tired to play games with her. Since then, she hasn't made a peep during the night. In the morning it's a different story. Does the fact that she can remember not to make sounds during the night indicate that she probably doesn't have dementia or Alzheimer's? What does it indicate, if anything at all?

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All medications have potential side effects - that doesn't mean everyone will experience the side effects. Honestly, it doesn't seem very fair, to withhold an antibiotic that may clear up her infection. She could be suffering in ways she can't even articulate.
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When a person with dementia is able to "act normal" and be on good behavior for short periods during the day (in front of visitors or a doctor, etc.) it is called "showtiming." As the dementia advances the period they can showtime decreases and then goes away altogether. I wonder if GM's ability to apparently shut off the noises for a while at your request is an example of showtiming!?
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When I recently had a uti I was very aware of several symptoms (such as loss of balance and falling) but not why they were happening and not how to prevent/control them.

All of the symptoms on my list went away when the uti cleared up.

So be patient until Grandma's uti is cured and see if that makes a difference. I hope, though, that she hasn't had a uti continuously since January! Is she now on an appropriate antibiotic?

The fact that she could refrain from making the noises at least for a short time does not preclude having dementia. Sometimes symptoms come and go.
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No, she hasn't. However, she was just diagnosed with a UTI. I'm now waiting on the doctor to prescribe something. He initially prescribed Cipro but I'm refusing it unless absolutely necessary due to its side effects.

Apparently I spoke too soon about the nighttime sounds. Grandma is back to making sounds on/off in the middle of the night. The other day she initiated a conversation with me where she told me she doesn't know why she makes those sounds and that she doesn't want to make them. She said she doesn't know if she can stop and that she's not in pain. I'm hoping that after the UTI is treated, that she won't make the sounds so much. She recently developed a fear of falling (she hasn't fallen since 2014 or earlier) and a lack of confidence in her mobility. It's odd because she's been receiving physical therapy and her one month evaluation shows improvement.

But, what do you think it means that she's aware that she's making sounds but she doesn't know why she makes them?
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Has she been diagnosed with dementia?
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