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My mother was transfered from a Hospital to a Rehabilitation Center around 7:30 pm last night As her daughter and legal representative I stayed with her to complete and sign all the documents for admision and almost at 11:30 pm y askd if they need some more information or something else need to be one the nurse say No. For my Surprise today I requested an airmatress and the nurse supervidsor said that following her pictures she might not b able to get. a airmatress. I asked what pictures she was talking about and I could saw some of them of my nude mother breast, groint, and butt. I aske why I was not informe so I can decide or not to have those pictures taken and why they wait unto I left to take the pictures.The answer from the nurse is that as a policy of the clinic they need to take pictures of any possible wound. I felt almost violated as if the pictures were taken to me taking in considertion that my mom have ALzaimer. No further comments were done by the clinic personel , just that they will come back to me. I stay all day until 9:00pm and nobody gave me an answer about that policy or SOP of the clinic. Is this a legal issue? Do somebody has gone trouigh this situation? Hope to hear some feedbacks as Im to the point to take her out from there tomorrow morning. Thanks!

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This is absolutely the policy now, and they should have informed you of this. The photos are used to document the condition your mother was in when she arrived at the center (this eliminates the "she didn't have that ____when she got here...." arguments or accusations) and also to compare against later to document the progress of the wound healing. Look at the admission paperwork - there should be a HIPAA-mandated notice within that paperwork that states photos may be recorded to document care, etc., and either your mother or an authorized representative signed this form prior to her admission. HIPAA laws forbid the photographs from being released to anyone not directly associated with your mother's care without her consent. Welcome to the digital age.
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Perhaps it is standard policy to take pictures but unless the wounds are actually on her private parts, they should be very judicious about how they take the photos. In older days, we simply documented in writing and measured wounds. I can't imagine that pictures actually tell more of the story, especially depth and wound character, unless they have a very special camera and skills. But I guess the 'cover your butt' legal atmosphere has taken over. Still, pictures should provide for the patient's modesty and dignity. It may be the policy, but if the pictures were too intrusive and you feel that her privacy was violated, you could register a complaint with them to make them more sensitive about how they take those pictures.
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I do know when my Mother was moved from the hospital to Rehab Facility two nurses came in to "look at" her and they had a camera. We ask what was going on. We were told they have to document any wounds, bruises,bedsores, etc. upon arrival. They were very gentle and checked Mother over thoroughly. She had nothing of interest and no pictures were taken. '

The nurse later explained it was for liability issues and had Mother a wound, this way they could be sure of its progress while there. You know, this is what it looked like when she got here and now it looks like this.

It made perfect sense, they need to know what they are dealing with in order to help the patient.
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I understand the importance of taking pictures of of bruises, sores, etc. but ONLY with the permission of the caregiver or the patient if the patient is lucid. It should have been discussed and if you are not comfortable of the way this was handled...speak up now! It is important to establish boundaries of what is acceptable and do not just accept it as "normal". What else is "normal" to them that could be unacceptable to you or your loved one? You are there to oversee the care your loved one is receiving...
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This happened to my mother when she was admitted to the ER from a nursing home. The ER used them to show me that the nursing home was neglecting their duties with my mother and I used them to make a complaint with the Ombudsman as well as to get her into another facility.

It sounds to me like it is a standard practice, but if you have any questions ask the Ombudsman to investigate.
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I believe this is pretty standard nowadays. Your mother's pictures are proof of her condition at the time of entering the facility. Should she become worse, there is proof that the condition worsened while in their care. Should she become better - there is also proof of that. The former is the liability issue the nurse spoke of. These pictures are part of your mom's record and should normally be kept safe and secure by the facility.
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Yes, as my husband was moved from the Hospital to the Rehab Center, after filling out several forms, the nurse gave me a permission form to sign, that they can check him out and take pictures of any bruises, sores etc. for documentation. It is for their protection, and I understood that, especially since he had hurt his knee the day before the stroke. It's also for your benefit, if something shows up later then you are able to point out that this is new and it happened while your mother was in their care.
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While I can understand a nursing home/rehab center wanting to protect themselves against those that would frivoulously suing, it it unconscionable that they did not inform you of this policy and ask if you wanted to be present during the exam. We as consumers -- especially in the healthcare field dealing with nursing homes, assisted living and in-home caregivers -- need to become better educated and learn to ask questions no matter how inconsequential they may seem
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Photos like this are pretty standard and when you do the paperwork for them for admission there is a release to allow for this or a waiver of liability on it. It is SOP by & large. They could have handled it better but it may have been a very difficult, erratic situation at the time for all involved. You probably don't have an opt-out on it either if this is considered within standards of care in your area.
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our PTs often use photos of wounds not just for liability but also to document progress or lack thereof in wound care - it can be a lot more helpful as well as more efficient than measuring and describing verbally, and you don't end up wondering if it really is smaller or better or worse than last time you looked. These go in the medical record and are "protected health information" under HIPAA as noted above.
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