What are the recommended steps to amend neglectful care? - AgingCare.com

What are the recommended steps to amend neglectful care?

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While living in an assisted living/memory care residence, my Mother developed a kidney infection, resulting in hospitalization. Upon examination the doctor suggested neglected hygiene care by her care givers. What are the recommended steps to amend the neglectful care? Plus steps to file complaints with: the facility, county & state of Wisconsin, agencies.

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Mother goes to Respite Care every three months (1 or 2 weeks) at time when available. Each time RTI occurs . I observed staff / caregivers don't give them water enough. Only when asked . Not good , I personally suggested water time every two hours at lest 5 oz daily . You will see great results. I do this withmother at home except she drinks and I refill she gets about 48 oz daily plus two Ensure Plus . Precious
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I hate to sound so negative, but often times, it is the patient who is bringing the infections on and there may be little you can do. I currently work for a woman whose hygiene habits are atrocious. Reminding her of proper wiping means nothing to her since from moment to moment she doesn't remember. I prefer to do all cleansing when she lets me, but she is out of the home three days a week at an adult daycare and we have no control over what goes on there. She has to be told to wash her hands constantly and sometimes that is met with hostility. I agree with those who suggested a calm yet firm talk with administration or even a private talk with caregivers if possible. The woman I work for also doesn't drink enough, so that contributes to the problem. It's maddening to know what the problem is and to never be able to fix it, because they can't be reasoned with. We understand your frustration.
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Did you confirm what the hygiene situation was with your mother? My mother and many of her friends, who do not have dementia, bathe daily, use proper hygiene, proper diet, proper everything....and they get recurring UTI's, nonetheless. Most see specialists about this problem. I'd explore all potential causes.
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All good answers. Further to Barb's recommendation, you can take the approach that a situation of concern has arisen and you'd appreciate their (agency) input on how to address and avoid it in the future.

Let them be part of the team and the solution. That will require them to do their own investigation and problem solving, and they shouldn't feel threatened.

Another thing to ask in their consideration is "how can WE ensure this doesn't happen again", or less threatening, "how can we avoid this from happening again"?

Think of ways you can help your mother, such as suggesting to the agency that they make hygiene a happy event, followed by tea, cider, listening to music, something that she looks forward to after the bathing, cleanup or similar activity.
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I had an uncle in a skilled nursing facility not because he needed that level of care but because he was placed there from hospitalization and wanted to stay. I was told he refused ahowers. I requested that i immediately be notified when he refused and I would come right over. I was never notified and after many missed showers and a hospitalization for a severe kidney infection i made a point of being there on the evenings that he was scheduled for a shower. For me, that was the only thing that worked even after being assured by the nurse manager, case worker. Etc, that i would be notified. Good luck, this is not as easy at it sounds. For my mom I would have nice body cream ready for her after her showers and make a big fuss about how pretty she looked and how nice she smelled.
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Oh, I've been down this road more than once. Was the AL aware that she needed help in that area? I wouldn't start by filing complaints, but by speaking to the director of nursing and making sure that steps are being taken by the staff so this doesn't happen again. Help with toileting (use wipes and make sure to go from front to back), making sure she's hydrated, and changed frequently if she's incontinent. Good luck--I hope your concerns are addressed!
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Once again, I agree with Barb. My mother also had bladder infections when she was in the nursing home and was hospitalized. The ER nurse told me that Mom's hygiene wasn't that good. Mom used to say that when she bathed, the aide would wash her and then hand her the cloth to wash her private area. Obviously, she wasn't doing such a good job. When I had a Care Conference for her, I mentioned to the staff that when Mom was initially hospitalized for a UTI, she became combative and slapped and scratched a nurse and gouged me as well. After that, they decided on their own to test her monthly for infections. No complaint filing was necessary.
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Here's the thing. If mom was refusing assistance, caregivers can't force mom to bathe.

I would contact AL admins in a neutral, non accusatory way and tell them the findings.
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