Can someone recommend a laptop or tablet computer for a stroke patient who used to journal-need spell check and large keys?

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My Mother had several small strokes and has right-side numbness and a bit of right control issues. She also experiences memory and confusion issues that are exaggerated when fatigued. Prior to her stokes, she loved to journal an write cards & letters. I would love to learn about "Senior" Apps or programs.

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You need to consult an assistive technology specialist. They may also be able to tell you if Medicaid will pay if it is important to her communication. I used to do this job in the school system. This specialist will look at her abilities, language and motor skills as well as memory issues and determine which devices to try. IPad has many apps that may be helpful, but a laptop with special software may be most appropriate. There are easy speech to text programs that can cost anywhere from $0 to $200. With this an individual that has motor skills problems and intact speech can dictate easily into the word processing program. If they have word finding problems or spelling issues they can use a word prediction program that can give a list of probable words that would come next and will speak them to the author.
If they have more severe communication issues there are programs that use pictures and symbols to create sentences and the translate into written word. The specialist would be more able to help after meeting with you and your LO.
To find someone, you can go online and Google eldercare and assistive technology and look for a regional locator.
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Grammygirl didn't say the extent of the damage the stroke had, which is why I was asking about dementia. If that is involved, technology is not likely to help. I trust the physical therapist would recognize that and perhaps suggest other options.
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Because technology may be easy for us to use sometimes we think that if we just teach our elderly loved ones how to use it they will pick it up as easily as we did and enjoy it as much as we do.

In several different situations I have seen families buy CD players and iPads for their elderly loved ones with the confidence that their loved ones will love it once they get used to it. But not once have I ever seen an elderly person able to use the Tablet, iPad, or CD player on their own. They get overwhelmed and put it aside and never use it.

I bought my dad a portable DVD player and some of his favorite movies. The DVD player had 3 options: on/off, play, pause. I went through it with my dad and he ooh'd and ahh'd over it, seemed to like it, but left to his own devices he put it on the floor and turned his tv back on. He never once used the DVD player.

The family of an elderly lady in a nursing home bought her an iPad because she had seen her family using one and expressed some interest in it. Once the lady had the iPad she didn't want to touch the iPad so someone had to be with her and encourage her to use it. She wouldn't use it herself and her family realized that they could have just used their own iPad since this lady didn't want to touch her newly purchased iPad. She had dementia and it was too overwhelming and frustrating for her. I suggested to the family that they take it with them when they leave but they thought that the lady might use it when no one was around. Within a month of buying it not only did the lady not want to use it but it was stolen right out of her room.

I hate to sound like a Negative Nelly and I'm sure there are some exceptions but I've never seen an elderly person with dementia successfully navigate new technology. Most have difficulty just using cordless phones and remote controls that they've been using for decades.
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If your mother is receiving occupational or physical therapy related to the stroke, ask the therapist. I have found that the therapists are frequently the ones who are most aware of new technology or apps that would benefit their patients, especially long term once therapy is not covered. There may be a speech recognition program that they recommend that can augment the typing for someone who is struggling physically. Also check with Area Agency of Aging, they may know of providers in your area who have special equipment targeting this type of user.
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Has she been evaluated to see what was affected by the stroke? Do you know if she is able to journal/write as she did before? Will she be receiving therapy to help with the use of her arm? I might explore the memory and confusion you describe before making the purchase for a new computer. Of course, if it's just her arm use that is the problem, a new device might be helpful.
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