Can anyone recommend a simple speech to large text device for someone who is deaf and has poor vision?

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Do they use braille? Is so I would go to any assosication for the blind in your area. Does a hearing aid help? I know amplifiers don't help either if there is a lot of background noise. But, if it is quiet they may help?
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in case someone else here is interested, i have an aladdin overhead style vision aid machine that isnt being used. its black / white print but still pretty bi**hin for reading mail and such. im in central indiana and would sell it pretty reasonably. by the time i get blind and senile our brains will be integrated with the www and we'll communicate with wry facial expressions. i could sneeze and have you assasinated. lol
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It is very hard to find a speech therapist in a NH. Your Parents PCP should write referral to see a speech. The therapist can set up for a tape recorder so the books are on tapes. There are also books with big print. Can be mailed every month.
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Goldduo: Are you looking for something that will listen to what people say, and turn it into very big text? To help with conversations, for instance?

I do like the suggestions here; just wondering what you are looking for.

Re audiobooks: we get a lot of them through our public library. If you have a tablet or smartphone, many libraries subscribe to Overdrive, so you can download books to listen to without having to go to library. (Handy, if you're chronically busy.)
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Also look on Amazon for text to speech pens - the pen "reads" the text out load as you scan the word with it. These are also used to help dyslexic readers. They come with various features such as dictionaries, translation, wireless, etc. so you can find the one that best suits your needs. This is helpful if your dad wants to read something that isn't on the Kindle or on Audible.
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Kazina took my answer. Yes, the Kindle has the ability to enlarge text so that it's HUGE. You can also adjust other settings like spacing and paragraphs.
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Try your local blind agency as they have devices free to help those with low vision. Good luck!
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I have another suggestion: Audio Books. My husband had a stroke on the left lower side taking away his ability to read. We had 1 1/2 years of therapy and this avid reader still does not recognize any letter. I'm not sure where you are located, but our source is through Wolfner Library in Jefferson City, Mo. 1-800-392-2614). You have to certify eligibility ( Blindness, visual impairment, reading disability or physical disability) with a Drs. signature. When your application is received, they send a machine, tapes, catalogues, postage to and from and an assigned person you go through all FREE. It is wonderful. You can get up to 7 tapes at one time and you have 6 weeks use. Tapes can be stopped or paused when my husband loses interest or we have visitors. I had other older tapes and regular machine, but would always lose our position. The books are called "talking Books" and I highly recommend the program. PS It actually puts my husband to sleep when he needs it.
I hope this helps. I just stumbled through it at the local library when I saw the application. Now I am hooked also. Good Luck. I hope it helps.
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An inexpensive android tablet may fit your needs. The voice recognition app is quite good. Use the accessibility settings to change the screen resolution. If you're a Pinterest fan, I've seen several boards from occupational and speech therapists with examples of speech to text technology.

I would also highly recommend contacting the assistive technology project in your state (if you're in the US). Each state has one funded by the Dept of Education to help people with disabilities to access technology to increase their independence. They can tell you about everything from reachers and grabbers to modified vehicles and home modifications. Go to your favorite search engine and search "assistive technology project" and your state.

Lastly, you might also visit AbleData and look through their database of more than 32,000 assistive devices and distributors. Their listings are unbiased (no recommendations, per se, but accurate descriptions of devices, their purpose and usage, price, and where to purchase).
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try kindle you can make the words on it very big and download ap like note pad could help
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