Is a recliner bad?

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My mom's circulation isn't great. She's also been having balance problems. What she has been doing is dumping herself into her recliner, reclining, and not coming out of it. She goes kind of into a stupor for hours and hours.

When she's not in the recliner, it's easier to get her to be active.

A couple thoughts I'm having:
1. I think that once she reclines that she mentally shuts-off. I notice her memory is worse, her balance is worse, everything is worse. For this, I'm not sure it's the recliner's "fault" but think that once she reclines that she kind of gives up on life. I think she is then unmotivated to come out of it and do things, again. When she sits upright, she might close her eyes for awhile and stop doing things, but she eventually starts her activities on her own.
2. I wonder if the recliner is bad for her circulation. Partly, it seems to discourage her from any movement. Partly, though, am not sure if reclining with her legs up and totally stationary for long periods of time is especially bad for her.

Anyone happen to know whether a recliner can actually be a bad thing?

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Recliners do provide some benefits but should not be overused because of damage that can be done (pressure sores, back damage, muscle weakness, etc.). We have received hundreds of calls from people with Parkinsons- because of their bed mobility problems many have resorted to sleeping in recliners. They are now having medical problems (and really want to sleep in a bed again) which prompts them to call for help. Sleeping in bed (and repositioning for comfort anytime you want) can provide better quality sleep- and for many people being able to remain sleeping with one's spouse is their #1 goal.
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Two words: Rocking Chair
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Stiver488824, do you have back problems? Any mobility problems? Is the recliner comfortable? Does it fit you well? (Not too narrow, not too long or short in the seat -- it ends where your legs bend.)
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I have a basic recliner is it good for my back
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I have a basic recliner us it good for mt bad vacj
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Lilacalani, no recliners in this house, either. There's a reason they are called "lazyboy" :P

My Dad [93] has a recliner and so does Mom [97] but rarely does Mom use her recliner... she rather sit in her straight back wing chair. Mom is definitely more mobile than Dad is :)
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I saw my husband morphing into his recliner. It was scary. He became more and more lethargic, saying it was to hard to get out of it, and therefore he stayed in it. I finally convinced him to get rid of the darn thing. He's now walking more, his posture is getting better, and I think his mind is better. So I say, "No more recliners!"
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Zombie- my prayers are with you- it doesn't sound like there is much you are able to do. Lots of good info- recliners have some good benefits but "living in them" is a very bad idea. Movement and "use it or lose it" mentality is key for anyone's health. Bed mobility problems (getting in/out of bed and repositioning) can be an underlying issue of the recliner question. Lots of calls of people sleeping in recliners because they can't use the bed- or people giving up and staying in bed all day because of transfer problems. There are many assistive products available to help them but often people don't know where to look.
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I know this is an old post, 15 months to be exact. My mother died over 18 months ago, and my father has lived in his recliner (when not in bed) all that time. He's getting weaker and weaker. I've always thought the inactivity would kill him but he goes on. He looks and smells dead but never actually dies. I hate waiting for death. I would much rather that he decide to live and get up before he can't any longer. It takes him a few minutes to get out of the recliner these days while he rocks back and forth. He is diabetic too and won't see a doctor. He (and my brother) thinks he is fine, and life is just fine to live in a pseudo-vegetative state.
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We bought my father a lift chair because he wouldn't get out of bed. After he had the chair, he would at least get a little exercise walking to the chair, to the bathroom, to meals, a little therapy and then back to bed. He was at the point where he was unable to walk unassisted. Also being able to put his feet up helped with the edema in his legs.
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