What is reasonable compensation for a previous power of attorney - Healthcare Property status and caregiver?

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We (the family) just reobtained POA - Healthcare & Property status and the inheritance of our loved one's Estate by Will. This was after a very messy estrangement which resulted in now being asked to pay a claim for a large sum of $ for caretaking and POA responsibilities. We feel the amount being asked is onerous but do not want to create a litigious situation. Aside from the Estate's lawyer (whom we have consulted and they are remaining rather neutral), to whom can we go, in Ontario, Canada, for advice on what to settle as a fee for this caregiver/POA's services in the last year?

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I agree, cwillie, and thus my post herein.
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Not so much judgment as a wary skepticism of your LO's manipulation and motives, I expect they are a handful and could easily turn on you when things aren't going their way. You haven't really given any details about your LO's needs and abilities, your relationship to them, the relationship of the past caregiver or the number of years they were together so it is difficult to get a feel for what is appropriate. Try to reach a compromise, if they sue you will all lose.
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If only it could be so easily "summarized", as you attempt to do. Do I detect a hint of sarcasm or judgement? We are grateful the estrangement was ended and we are reconciled - we consider this act nothing less than miraculous and it was accompanied with great contrition on the part of the loved one. Human nature is too easily impacted by money and power and we think there are a great deal of issues here that go beyond the attempt you have made to offer a preclusive summary. Suffice it to say, here we are trying to find a just compromise to a claim we find exorbitant.
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You had been estranged from your LO... a parent? They made a life without you, including a caregiver who they thought highly enough of to appoint them POA and to include them in their Will. This caregiver did their best for them but it reached a point where they were not willing to do more and recommended your LO move to assisted living. LO refused. So this loyal caregiver saw no other option but to resign POA as they were not willing to cross the boundaries they had set. Your loved one had a hissy fit and removed them from their life and Will. Do I have it right? Does this dynamic sound familiar, could it relate to how you became estranged from them yourself?
It sounds as though this person was a loyal friend and helper and although they initially had no thoughts of accepting pay they are hurt and upset. Be generous. And good luck caring for your LO, I have a feeling you will need it.
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No, CTTN55, the housekeeper/companion has been fully compensated.

You see, the problem here is that the previous POA/CG was also liberally written into the revised Will! They have now been completely written OUT of the new will. They resigned their POA - HC responsibilities and were stripped of their POA - Property by my loved one. So now they want compensation... They did a good job in many respects but tried to push my loved one into care prematurely and got a BIG surprise. The effort to try to get my loved one into care almost killed them, seriously, The hospital she was admitted to refused to be part of a discharge plan that was against my loved one's wishes. It was a very stressful mess and resulted in the previous POA/CG resigning as POA - HC.
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Please forgive my use of terms incorrectly. My loved one is still alive. I am the POA.

Thanks for your thoughts, cwillie, I still have to factor in the POA responsibilities...
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Is part of the money to CG going to be for reimbursement for the housecleaner that the CG hired? There was never any discussion of pay before the CG started doing all of this?
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Call a local homecare agency with a detailed list of hours and duties and ask for an estimate of their fees, easy peasy.
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Well, your post is confusing from the outset because you can not have POA of any kind over a dead person, you mention an Estate and Will, so I assume we are talking about the caregiver asking the Estate for compensation after death? There are lawyers, and perhaps paralegals, which will mediate a dispute for a fee. It would be better to do without if possible... they claim, you counterclaim, and you reach a compromise. I generally feel that if both parties are unhappy with the outcome you probably have a fair deal.
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The caregiver lived in their own home (nearby our loved one). They checked in on our L.O. a few times a day and provided our L.O. w/ the same dinner they ate, delivered to our L.O. nightly. This CG also provided transport & covered all aspects of our L.O.'s needs (groceries and supplies). The CG was not a companion. The CG hired a person to do cleaning and this person also became a close friend and companion.

In this area of Ontario, full-time CG, 24/7 by a private nursing care company was quoted for 2 PSW's as being about $3,200/month. Our situ with this claiming CG was much much less than that. Then there is the cost of the responsibilities of POA'ing.

I have done my research and went to my L.O.'s estate lawyer well prepared with 6 pages of summarized research and findings. My question now is, where do I get some professional advice about this thorny situ? Another Lawyer, an owner of a private Nursing care service, who?

Thanks for taking the time to give your expertise!
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