Raging red rash. Any advice? - AgingCare.com

Raging red rash. Any advice?

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I didn't know where else to post this because there's no "medical" group per se. Mom has AD and still manages to shower herself. However, she recently showed me a rash she has developed under her breasts. I suspect it's related to her not wearing a bra most of the time around the house, and well, with age, she's lost all "perkiness" in that region (trying to be delicate)...At first, I tried using Goldbond Medicated (spray on) powder because it looked like a sweat rash...I even bought "nursing pads" to create a dry/comfort barrier between her skin/bra (when she does wear one). It seemed to help some...I bought some very gentle non-scented baby wash to use to avoid irritation of the area. Then I bought spray on Calamine lotion to try a different time...Today it's as red as ever. I strongly suggested my mom stay in bed, on her back so that the air can "circulate" in that area (where it can't while sitting secondary to her anatomy.) The area is dry and quite red with irritation...I don't know what to try next...diaper rash cream? I suppose it could be yeast - so, how does one best treat that? I really would rather not run to the doctor without exploring options. Advice is appreciated.

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So, there are some advantages to being flat-chested. :D
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I had a nasty rash under my breasts. I used zinc oxide powder to dry out the area and it healed up. I also used the powder when my father got a rash on his groin area. You can  ask a pharmacist what would be best. 
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There's also a form of psoriasis that forms a flat and raging red rash in the skin folds, it's called inverse or flexural psoriasis. Google it for images to see if it's what your mother has. I had it about 10 years ago and never knew what it was, but gosh it was wretched. That of course is a different treatment than for a fungal infection, but efforts to keep the area cool and dry should help in either case.
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Madge, you're right. I didn't think of that, b/c in my mind there was still a question whether or not the rash is in fact a yeast infection. That's not yet been diagnosed and/or confirmed by a med professional.

I've used cornstarch for years w/o any problem, but since any rashes generally occurred in summer, I knew they were from heat.

You made a good point.
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Don't use corn starch as yeast feeds on it
A doctor can prescribe nystatin in powder or cream to clear it up

It's a challenge to keep the area dry but try placing baby washcloths under her breasts to absorb dampness
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Thanks all for the advice/insight! Another thing I found is called ComfortSling...It's an apparatus that was designed for women undergoing radiation for breast cancer (I'm not familiar with the side effects behind the development of the "sling".) But, it was found to be useful for big busted women - the inventor even changed the name to make it more "universal". Gotta love the internet!
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I would say first get a diagnosis and clear up what probably is yeast then use the barrier cream cwillie's nurse recommend and get a good cotton bra that does not trap moisture like a synthetic one does. Even stick half a sanitary napkin inside each cup for added absorption.
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Golden, I was skeptical too when our nurse recommended using a barrier cream (her first choice was Barriere by Wellskin). Apparently this is commonly used in wound and ostomy care, anywhere that there is skin breakdown because of too much moisture.
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Have you asked her doctor what it is and what treatment is appropriate?

I too think it sounds like a yeast infection. Wearing a bra is probably good to prevent skin to skin contact. An antifungal cream, OTC or from the doctor if a stronger one is needed. The area needs to be kept cool and dry.

cwillie - I am interested that a barrier cream helps.
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If the area stays moist and isn't getting much air, it could be yeast. Moisture, warmth and no air is a good recipe for it. Once established, it may take a yeast fighting med to clear it up. I'd ask the doctor about it. There are over the counter meds for this, but, I'd check with her doctor first. If it's yeast, it will likely respond quickly to a med that's designed to treat it. You can get those designed for vaginal yeast infections or those that are designed for jock itch. The active ingredient percentage varies.

Once healed, you'll have to fight to keep the area dry. It sounds like you are doing a good job with that, but, I would consider a lightweight bra that is comfortable.

My cousin has very large breast and she isn't wild about wearing a bra, so, what I found that works VERY well are these pullover bras. They are made from a very good fabric that doesn't hold moisture. It's lightweight and has no hooks or hard straps. You just pull it over the head and it fits like a snug t-shirt. It's not tight, but, is just enough to keep the skin from rubbing and sweating.
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