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make sure you call people caregiver has worked for ... and those are not always real?? i haven't read all the responses...but i would definitely have a cam....there is a lot of abuse out there....and that has always scared me!!
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More than whether or not the patient likes her/his caregiver at first meeting, I think it's important to note how the caregiver reacts to negative treatment. If your LO is anything like mine, she/he is going to reject any stranger who comes in and tries to take the place of a familiar caregiver.
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I agree with what ferris said. See the interaction between your parent and the potential caregiver. I would try to set it up so that its natural too. Try to provide a situation that appears natural so that you can be a fly on the wall so to speak.
If your parent does not like the caregiver all the other stuff goes by the wayside so to speak. So definitely make sure they are qualified, that goes without saying but the interaction between your Mom and them is most important by far.
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Action is better than words. People can say a lot of things to make you believe that they are a great many years experience. First day,show that caregiver how to do your love one routines. Day 2,you show caregiver how you did for your love one while you watching of that caregiver's body languages(stress taste) Day 3 let caregiver do her/his tasks. You will find out if you hire the right caregiver.
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I like your questions, Brie. Planning follow-up question will help you avoid the "miss America answers".


When one gets good at interviewing it becomes more of a conversation - you're still able to ask all the questions but there is a more natural flow, putting the applicant more at ease.
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How do you go about getting background check? Can you just ask the police to run the check for you?
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I will be looking for a caregiver for my mom who has ALZ and I've put a few questions together. The caregiver will be coming from an agency and the agency conducts criminal background checks. I want to know what kind of experience the person has dealing with a person with ALZ and how they would interact with my mother. Here are some of my questions:

1. How long have you been a caregiver?

2. What are your strongest skills in caregiving?

3. Tell me about five different people for whom you have been a caregiver.
3a. What caregiving skills did you perform for them?
3b. What was a typical day like for you?

4. Tell me about your most rewarding experience as a caregiver?

5. Tell me about the most challenging experience you have had as a caregiver and how you dealt with the challenge.

6. Tell me about your former work experience before you became a caregiver.
6a. What skills from these jobs have you been able to use as a caregiver?

7. Why did you decide to become a caregiver?

8. What would be your ideal day as a caregiver?

9. Tell me what have you learned from being a caregiver?

Depending on the answers I would ask follow-up questions. These are just a few questions that I hope would open up a dialogue and give me a sense of the caregivers strengths and how they may perform as a caregiver for my mother. I know that answering questions does not always give you a true picture but it will give me a sense of what their work experience has been in dealing with persons with ALZ, how they have handled certain situations and how they would interact with my mother.
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Think of yourself and what you would want to know about the person. Also, see how the interviewee interacts with your loved one and visa versa. There are no set questions and most times it is just gut instinct that will guide you.
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Would absolutely recommend a criminal background check as well as a drug screen prior to hiring. If you go through an agency make sure they do this, don't just assume they do. If they are licensed as a Health Care Aide, Certified Nursing Assistant, Registered Nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse check with the State Board of Nursing to make sure no actions have been taken against them.
Good Luck in your search.
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p.s. I didn't mean to imply that the applicant should be wearing a suit to the interview - but they should be dressed in a way that indicates a desire to impress. In interviewing for a caregivers job there is nothing wrong with the applicant showing up in a uniform but it should be clean, in good repair and look like there was an attempt made to wear their best uniform.
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I use to teach classes on how to interview and conversely how to be interview. The biggest tip I can give is to avoid questions that can be answered with a "yes" or "no". The easiest way to do this is by putting these words in front of the question: "Tell me about a time you have..." The next thing would be to keep in mind that some people can interview very well and others poorly and it isn't always an indication of how well they can do the job. Look at silent messages as well. Was the person on time for the interview? Was the person prepared - did they bring a resume, references, a pen to write with? how is their appearence - while this isn't a job that requires a suit, it will indicate their desire to impress. Beware of a complainer and for sure look for red flags in answers where they shift or point blame - this is easily identified by asking "tell me about why you left your last job" or "tell me about a time when you had to work with a difficult client". Look for gaps in employment history and ask any to be explained. Beyond thoses tips - stick to questions concerning the responsibilities of the job as it relates to your LOs needs and to the applicants experience level - as it relates to the job you are hiring for. That doesn't mean you shouldn't ask about previous unrelated experience - just tie it back to your needs: "I see on your application you use to be a chef at Munchies - why did you switch to care giving"? - Which brings up one more tip - be wary of the "miss America answers" example; as an answer to the last question "Because I want to help people". That's all well and good but ask them to be more specific.
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It ' s near impossible to find every single necessity in only ONE person! At Caregivers meetings they inform you right the first time you attend : You CANNOT DO this ALONE!!! In spite of the warning I did for a time, because there was simply no other way, but had to give it up because of health reasons , plus a near nervous breakdown . ( we are in our eighties). The situation was unsustainable . He is in long term care now, where many people take care of several different issues, they work in shifts to begin with, and now we both enjoy several activities, while I have opportunity to re- collect myself. How can you ever find a substitute for that in one person only?
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A working interview is great, too. Make a list of the things your loved one needs help with, discuss these with a potential caregiver in an initial interview , then set up a second hands on "working" interview where you can oberve how he/she relates to--and performs tasks for--your loved one :)
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First determine what the caregiver must provide in services. This will help decide the questions to ask. Been down this route several times and have found that care giving depends on so much more than the responses to questions. You'll probably have to try out several caregivers before you find one that suits. I've basically used agencies to provide caregivers so the certification question is addressed, but also found that a "yes" response doesn't mean that the caregiver has a specific skill, such as shaving a gentleman or is physically able to handle the patient. You'll have to spend some time to assure yourself that the caregiver knows the job, the patient, and is able to meet all the patient's needs. You may even have to provide some training so the care giver knows how to deal with supply issues, laundry, cleaning, or other attendant tasks. Every household is different and every patient sees their care differently.
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Ask them if they are medically qualified.

I have a friend that requires a caregiver. Due to my friend's physical and mental health issues. On a number of occasions. I have found caregivers who are medically unqualified. Even though my friend is only in their early 20's. The same thing could apply to caring for someone that is elderly.
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Candy, sorry it took so long before you got an answer. I checked around the Aging Care website and found this article that should be helpful :)

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/questions-to-ask-before-hiring-caregiver-or-home-care-152188.htm
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