Follow
Share

My Mom has asked that I order her a DNR bracelet, besides her name what else should I have engraved on the bracelet? There are 5 lines of information possible. I think I'm missing something here!

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
I guess it depends on the state. Where I live, a DNR can only be ordered by a doctor who writes it into the PT's medical record. If you're not in a hospital / nursing home / hospice, essentially, you don't have one. Never heard of engraving the initials "DNR" on a bracelet. Here that would be ignored.

You can, however, sign a Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (MOLST), which you have to do with a medical professional, and it is printed on bright neon pink paper so that EMTs can see it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I do not know about the legality of DNR bracelets but I did learn something about DNR requests a few months before my Mom's passing. When Mom was admitted to hospitals, it was always requested by her and family that she be a DNR patient which was fine. However, and this is the bigger issue.....we find out that if we called for an ambulance & Mom had stopped breathing or in cardiac arrest, the EMTs are required to do CPR no matter verbally requested that they don't. We learned that there is a form that needed to be signed by her doctor which states DNR her. It needs to be handed to the EMTs the minute that they would have to start CPR. This is the only documentation they will accept. EMTs can't take just 'our word' for no DNR as they don't know my mother's wishes by us just saying so. I don't know if this is law in every state but please check with his/her doctor for this form which by the way, we pinned to the side of her refrig in case we needed it in a moments time.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

In the state of NJ a green form now has to be filled out. Mom has one at the AL that goes with her when sent to the hospital. I don't see where a bracelet say DNR would be a bad idea. The last time Mom was in the DNR didn't go with her from ER to the floor. I checked at the desk and the hospital signed a new one. Maybe putting your name on it and phone number? Or her primary doctor? For her peace of mind I see no problem.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

The OP said DNR bracelet I would consider there is a difference between that and and ID. one.
I wear a medic-alert , as Im allergic to all the meds that an ambulance team are allowed to give.. Here they have to be signed off by ones PCP, so that correct info is obtained.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

The ID bracelet is worth its cost, in my opinion, even though DNR on it means nothing. Other information on it can be very important unless your mother never leaves the house alone.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

As others have said it means twiddle squat. so save your money.
Legally every time one is discharged from hospital after signing a DNR form for that admission it canNOT be carried over to the next admission.
Wearing a bracelet, won't let anyone NOT administer first aid or treatment . Until they have more information. Documented either by her PCP or specialist that under circumstances due to *** she does not want heroic treatment performed.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Put down her name, obviously, blood type, if you want, allergies to medicines, if she's diabetic, transplant patient, HCV or HIV positive, foods if they are "toxic" allergies, phone numbers...whatever you ask for, they print out. (Mother actually wears 2 medical info bracelets) BUT a DNR must be with the patient. Mother carries her copies with her everywhere (has for like 20 years). She also has it prominently displayed in her home. All us kids know her wishes....and she's never alone---oh, also her DNR is on file with every hospital in a 20 mile range. She's really got the bases covered.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

My husband had an ID bracelet that had a contact in case of emergency, his clinic's name and phone number, the fact that he had a pacemaker and similar information. At his insistence I added the DNR, knowing that it would most likely be ignored if an emergency arose. If it made him feel better having it there, so be it. We also had DNR papers at home and on file at all his health providers' locations and in their computers.

Tosacem, I suggest using this opportunity to get an ID bracelet for your mom with helpful information on it, such as who to call in the event of an emergency. Put the DNR there, too, but don't rely on it for preventing resuscitation.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Along the same lines, I recall billboards that said "Think you're an organ donor? Not if your family doesn't know !" It seems reasonable that the same thing would apply to DNRs, but with the additional "if it isn't written down, it doesn't exist!"
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

did you know that even if you have a DNR that you can always change your mind later? That's how it is in Ohio and I wouldn't be surprised if it's like that in all 50 states. I don't think you're be doomed if you have a DNR and happen to change your mind later. Should she change her mind later, she would have to immediately destroy everything related to the DNR, and update her hospital records with the hospital
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

You need to check with the laws where you are. Some states do allow a DNR bracelet others you MUST have the DNR papers at the time EMS or hospital care is provided.
I was told that if I did not have the DNR or in my case POLST with me "it did not exist"
Wisconsin I know does have a bracelet that states DNR you could check out the Wisconsin DNR bracelets on line and see what information they have.
Bracelet or not you should always keep a copy of the DNR on you and if possible your Mom should also have one. Keep copies in the car at all times.
Illinois has a program called "Spot the Dot" a yellow decal is placed on the back window of the car, a yellow pamphlet is kept in the glove compartment the pamphlet contains photo ID, medical info contact numbers and a copy of the DNR could be kept as well. A pamphlet for each person that may occupy the car can be kept. First responders at a scene see the yellow dot know there is info in the glove compartment and it can make medical care much easier.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Um. MedicAlert bracelets and the like are more usually used to alert paramedics or first aiders to the presence of key factors like diabetes, pacemakers or splenectomy. That's not to say that they couldn't be used to warn of DNR instructions' being in place, I suppose; but it isn't the standard approach.

What made your mother think of getting a bracelet for this? An alternative, if she's really bound and determined to make absolutely sure that no one ever comes near her with a defibrillator, might be to consider a well-placed tattoo - less likely to be overlooked in a crisis, and she'll always have it with her.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am wondering how legal that would be if it came down to the actual situation. Like we thought we had everything covered since my mother had filled out a Health Directive and a DNR but my sister who is an attorney and married to a fireman/EMT told us about a form that we had to have filled out and keep it in the house because when EMTs go out if you don't have it to show them they will resuscitate. And when they came out for my father's death even though they knew it was natural and they said very peaceful, they still scrutinize what was probably a DNR.

One thing we have run into and didn't ever consider it prior to this starting to happen .... I guess from her dementia, she only wants to eat a few bites and is losing weight in the nursing home and at some point they could have her treating physician order her to be either physically fed if she can physically eat, or a feeding tube  if she can't or won't. We are doing some investigation into that because if they are put on a feeding tube, they could live for a long time even if they had a stroke Etc.
       I don't think you can get all that on a bracelet and I'm not sure of the legality, so I would check with the type of lawyer that handles those issues. Because if that situation did come up and you decide to remove the tube, it's a difficult decision and will probably cause problems from some family members.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

DNR
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter