Besides her name, what should I put on my mother's DNR bracelet? - AgingCare.com

Besides her name, what should I put on my mother's DNR bracelet?

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My Mom has asked that I order her a DNR bracelet, besides her name what else should I have engraved on the bracelet? There are 5 lines of information possible. I think I'm missing something here!

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I guess it depends on the state. Where I live, a DNR can only be ordered by a doctor who writes it into the PT's medical record. If you're not in a hospital / nursing home / hospice, essentially, you don't have one. Never heard of engraving the initials "DNR" on a bracelet. Here that would be ignored.

You can, however, sign a Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (MOLST), which you have to do with a medical professional, and it is printed on bright neon pink paper so that EMTs can see it.
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I do not know about the legality of DNR bracelets but I did learn something about DNR requests a few months before my Mom's passing. When Mom was admitted to hospitals, it was always requested by her and family that she be a DNR patient which was fine. However, and this is the bigger issue.....we find out that if we called for an ambulance & Mom had stopped breathing or in cardiac arrest, the EMTs are required to do CPR no matter verbally requested that they don't. We learned that there is a form that needed to be signed by her doctor which states DNR her. It needs to be handed to the EMTs the minute that they would have to start CPR. This is the only documentation they will accept. EMTs can't take just 'our word' for no DNR as they don't know my mother's wishes by us just saying so. I don't know if this is law in every state but please check with his/her doctor for this form which by the way, we pinned to the side of her refrig in case we needed it in a moments time.
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In the state of NJ a green form now has to be filled out. Mom has one at the AL that goes with her when sent to the hospital. I don't see where a bracelet say DNR would be a bad idea. The last time Mom was in the DNR didn't go with her from ER to the floor. I checked at the desk and the hospital signed a new one. Maybe putting your name on it and phone number? Or her primary doctor? For her peace of mind I see no problem.
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The OP said DNR bracelet I would consider there is a difference between that and and ID. one.
I wear a medic-alert , as Im allergic to all the meds that an ambulance team are allowed to give.. Here they have to be signed off by ones PCP, so that correct info is obtained.
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The ID bracelet is worth its cost, in my opinion, even though DNR on it means nothing. Other information on it can be very important unless your mother never leaves the house alone.
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As others have said it means twiddle squat. so save your money.
Legally every time one is discharged from hospital after signing a DNR form for that admission it canNOT be carried over to the next admission.
Wearing a bracelet, won't let anyone NOT administer first aid or treatment . Until they have more information. Documented either by her PCP or specialist that under circumstances due to *** she does not want heroic treatment performed.
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Put down her name, obviously, blood type, if you want, allergies to medicines, if she's diabetic, transplant patient, HCV or HIV positive, foods if they are "toxic" allergies, phone numbers...whatever you ask for, they print out. (Mother actually wears 2 medical info bracelets) BUT a DNR must be with the patient. Mother carries her copies with her everywhere (has for like 20 years). She also has it prominently displayed in her home. All us kids know her wishes....and she's never alone---oh, also her DNR is on file with every hospital in a 20 mile range. She's really got the bases covered.
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My husband had an ID bracelet that had a contact in case of emergency, his clinic's name and phone number, the fact that he had a pacemaker and similar information. At his insistence I added the DNR, knowing that it would most likely be ignored if an emergency arose. If it made him feel better having it there, so be it. We also had DNR papers at home and on file at all his health providers' locations and in their computers.

Tosacem, I suggest using this opportunity to get an ID bracelet for your mom with helpful information on it, such as who to call in the event of an emergency. Put the DNR there, too, but don't rely on it for preventing resuscitation.
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Along the same lines, I recall billboards that said "Think you're an organ donor? Not if your family doesn't know !" It seems reasonable that the same thing would apply to DNRs, but with the additional "if it isn't written down, it doesn't exist!"
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did you know that even if you have a DNR that you can always change your mind later? That's how it is in Ohio and I wouldn't be surprised if it's like that in all 50 states. I don't think you're be doomed if you have a DNR and happen to change your mind later. Should she change her mind later, she would have to immediately destroy everything related to the DNR, and update her hospital records with the hospital
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