Someone told me to sell all my Dad's assets and put 80% in a IRA and 20% towards his health. Is that a good idea? - AgingCare.com

Someone told me to sell all my Dad's assets and put 80% in a IRA and 20% towards his health. Is that a good idea?

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He's in rehab center for therapy to walk again and has parkinsons and still think theres hope for him to go home , I'm not ready to give up.I'm his daughter and I saw him everyday . So I'm not ready to give up on him .Although I couldn't help him if he can't walk again. I couldn't take care of him and pick him up the way they do.

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Does your dad earn income? If he doesn't get paid for a job, he's not eligible to contribute to an IRA. Both traditional and Roth IRAs have contribution limits. Under 50? $5,000. 50 or over? $6,000. In my opinion, the advice you've been given, for whatever reason, is wrong.

What are you trying to accomplish? If you're trying to hide his assets? You can pretty much forget it. If he's married, there's spousal impoverishment rules that will save some of them, but beyond that? Before Medicaid is going to step in, he's going to have to spend down his own money on his own care. Any gifts he gives will be disallowed by Medicaid's 5-year look-back rule.
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Something about the "advice" doesn't sound right.
A person who right now is in a rehab facility and has parkinson's likely is going to need substantial caregiving and sooner rather than later. And whether at home or in a facility will be expensive as it sounds like you cannot physically do it.

If dad is in rehab after a hospitalization, then Dad's stay is being paid for by Medicare. But rehab under Medicare is limited. They get 21 days @ 100%, then after that it all depends on just how dad is progressing. Now for those with parkinson's, they can benefit from the new rulings on Medicare rehab in that "progress" in therapy or rehab now allows for "sustaining or maintaining" ability rather than the higher hurdle of "progress". So dad could get the maximum of 100 days. Really you need to speak with the NH to see what they anticipate for Medicare to pay and for how long. Once Medicare quits, most family have to either private pay with the elders assets to get the spend down done and then apply for Medicaid; or if they are poor enough to begin with they can apply for Medicaid; or family private pays for their elder's care or the elder has long term care insurance. But if they live long enough, imho, they will flat run out of funds and apply for Medicaid. The Roth will be an asset that will have to be liquidated to pay for their care before Medicaid will ever pay too. I just don't see it as being a good idea for one who is already needing services. A younger healthy person who still has work years ahead, yeah they could make a Roth work but that doesn't sound like your dad.

So what is dad's finances like? Right now does he have 6 figures liquid? A year of NH with medications could easily run 100K. Hired caregivers maybe 1/2 of that.
Park seems to have a different set of issues - (my mom has Lewy Body Dementia and a lot of Lewy ones also have Park so I've gotten to speak to several family who's elder has Park & Lewy) - and if you can I'd suggest you contact your local chapter of the Parkinson's Association to see what resources are in your area to help your dad. They may also have a list of advisors (legal and financial) who understand what may be best for those with Park to place funds into. Good luck.
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This sounds like terrible advice. There are rules for investment in IRAs. They may have meant an annuity that would provide some income. Since your father has Parkinson's, it may be wise to seek the advice of an adviser knowledgeable in the affairs of the elderly. I do not know how much your father has, but it may be that all of his assets will need to go toward his care. If the money runs out, he may have to apply for assistance from Medicaid. We never know what the future holds when there is a health problem.

There are some legal ways that you can protect assets if there are enough to worry about. Please talk to an attorney about that.
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No. Minimum distribution requirements apply to IRAs and if he's past that age he'd just have to take mandatory withdrawals.

I don't understand what putting 20% toward his health means.

I think someone's given you bad advice.
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There are age limits on IRA's. If he is over 59 1/2, forget it. Go up to the Money and Legal tab and click on Financial Matters.
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Unless the "someone" is a professional financial advisor/CPA, I would call one and ask what they recommend.
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