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My mother had an odd experience yesterday. I've been researching it but wanted to see if anyone here has ever heard of anything like this.


She says she had just sit down and closed her eyes. When she opened them the vision in her left eye was tinted purple. She described it as if there was a purple filter over the eye. It was not a spot or blur. It lasted about a minute.


She had taken a Prolia shot a few hours before the incident.


Just before the incident, she picked up a box left by UPS at the door. She did not have to strain to do this, but may be relevant.


Sound familiar to anyone?

To anyone who might be interested in what's happening with this, Mom has had a few more episodes. Three in her left eye, one in her right eye that involved her vision being blocked. We went to a ophthalmologist. He described the left-eye episode as "Floaters and Flashes," which is caused by the vitreous detaching or rubbing against the retina. He was not sure about the right-eye episode. Meanwhile, we got a carotid ultrasound, which indicated some blockage in her right carotid artery.
We saw a vascular surgeon today. He was not too sure either, because Mom's symptoms are not completely consistent with carotid artery blockage. 

So...

He gave her a script for Plavix, and we will be seeing another vascular specialist for a second opinion. The PCP is setting up an appointment with a neurologist and an MRI.

...and we thought May was going to be a light dr. appointment month!
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Reply to NewandTrying
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My color was Orange. LOL.
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Reply to Sendhelp
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For future reference New and Trying,
There are conditions where the patient will be unable to make a good decision for themselves, and until they h a v e recovered enough from an event, be sure you see to it that they are transported (kicking and screaming if you will) via paramedics who are qualified to assess an individual. Or use persuasion.

This is just my opinion, but I think there is way too much going overboard on the topic of "It is their choice" if they are competent. At the same time, I would be the first to defend someone's right to dignity, self-determination, and choice about
their own life.

There are, however, exceptions. When a person has a DNR (do not resuscitate) in writing, posted on the refrigerator, etc. it may appear they have made their choice.
But even then, why would one need emergency paramedics, who resuscitate, we ask ourselves? And, did the person execute that document knowing the full extent of it's meaning, we wonder. And, does calling the paramedics cancel the DNR? Etc. etc. etc.

It's complicated, huh.

But it is not on you, New. You tried, and also made your choice. Good job, seeking out the information. You can only do your best!
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NewandTrying Apr 6, 2019
Sendhelp, you're making assumptions about my mother's mental state that are not true. She has some mild cognitive problems, but is very cautious and attuned to her health. She is also not one of those who refuses to go to the doctor. We have 5 appointments this month, (and I intend to mention this incident to her GP). If I thought for one minute that she did not understand or was confused about what I told her, I'd have forced the issue, but even then, the final decision would have been hers.

I think you may be saying that there is a fine line between competence and incompetence that it is dangerous to ignore. I'm sure that's true. And when that  day comes,  I hope I can count on you, and those on this forum, to help me understand it.
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New, what did the doctor say?
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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NewandTrying Apr 6, 2019
I gave Mom all the information I could find and suggested going to the ophthalmologist. She said she'd rather wait and see if it happened again. I told her that might be too late. But that was her decision.

I am not in a position to make medical decisions for my mother. It's her choice. Fortunately, I know she'll tell me right away if something like this happens again.
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Not an expert opinion, but an MRI would show if she was having a TIA (transient ischemic attack), which is a mini-stroke. Having a TIA might indicate a future stroke is pending.

See a doctor to find out what has happened. I would hurry.

I have also heard of the patient having an "aura" just prior to an epilepsy attack.

Seizures are listed as a side effect of Prolia by injection. Whatever the cause, the symptom should be reported to the physician.
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JoAnn29 Apr 6, 2019
My Gson gets cold before a seizure.
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I wouldn't "suggest" it, as she might say no. I'd just call her/him and describe the problem.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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Purple or dark, as though someone had turned down the lights for that eye, I wonder..?

Either way, report it to her doctor. Better safe than sorry.
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NewandTrying Apr 5, 2019
She said everything was purple, as if looking through a purple filter. Can't imagine it because I've never heard of anything like it.

Will suggest the ophthalmologist.
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I would call her ophthalmologist and ask. Could be a symptom of retinal problem. I would not waste time researching. Just call the doc.
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