How can public services/places help those who are caretakers of ones with Alzheimer's disease?

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I, for one, had trouble with Mom in a wheelchair. Doors are heavy and not automatic, ramps are rough or practically non-existent, store aisles are narrow and oftentimes cluttered. There are thresholds to negotiate. Candy and knick-knacks in reach at the registers. Is this the kind of feedback you are looking for?
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By the way, in doing a project on how to help caregivers one of the steps to take is to ask caregivers! You have found a means to do that. I congratulate your resourcefulness! I hope this isn't the only step you are taking, but I hope it helps spark some ideas for your project.
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By public services, do you mean those provided by government agencies? Or is it broader than that? Could you give examples of the kinds of services you have in mind?

I can offer this general suggestion: It can be VERY difficult to bring someone with dementia to an appointment. When at all possible appearing in person should not be required for things that can be handled over the phone or online. Services should be able to come to the person's home instead of requiring the caregiver to bring the person to an appointment.

Toileting help can be an issue away from home. Having bathrooms that can accommodate a wheelchair and a second person (and of the opposite gender) is a must! I don't think that is much different for persons with other kinds of impairments.
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If I were back in school, this is how I would approach the project, rather than asking for others to help me do it. That isn't going to be an option if you get a job in your field and face a similar issue/project.

First, what are the issues of Alzheimer's patients public services/places generally? Define the issues first, then address how they can be modified, adapted, or how caregivers can be helped.

Second, look at the issue from the perspective of the caregivers, so you have both sides of public places/services issues. Again, identify potential solutions from the caregiver perspective.

And don't forget to factor in the patient's difficulties, issues and what might help them that doesn't necessarily overlap in the First and Second issue approach.

Third, when issues do coincide or overlap, focus on those as they would reflect concerns on both sides of the issue.

Fourth, then start your research on assistive devices, ADA requirements, and determine which can be modified, and how, and which can't.

Fifth, it wouldn't hurt to research the ADA requirements and consider if they're adequate to provide assistance to the public places as well as the caregiver as well as the patient.
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That is a very broad scope, perhaps you need to narrow it down to some specific areas you feel need to be addressed.
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Public services are already overwhelmed and understaffed. Private non profits actually do a better job of pointing people in the right direction for help. So refer them to alz.org if the problem is Alzheimer's. Point them to a disease specific agency that deals with their particular problem.
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Go to your library and ask a reference librarian to help you.
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