Where to find programs in Montgomery County, MD that can assist an elderly person who cannot pay her property taxes? - AgingCare.com

Where to find programs in Montgomery County, MD that can assist an elderly person who cannot pay her property taxes?

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Is there a way to negotiate for a different arrangement that can avoid her worst fear that the county would confiscate her home.

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I got a copy of the Montgomery County, Maryland Senior. resources guide.
Call: Homeowners and Renters Tax Credit Program
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also check with your local legal services for the elderly or the regular legal services agency (these are free legal services for low income and elderly in every state) - often they offer information and assistance with a tax abatement program if one is available in your state (there's one in every community in Maine). Good luck!
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Jim, I live across the river over in northern Virginia. Just got my property tax bill and had noticed on the back there is help for senior citizens with disabilities or who have low income. I wouldn't be surprised if Montgomery County wouldn't have the same thing. Call the real estate tax office.
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If you have not solved the problem yet:
Call social services agencies and the department of aging in Montgomery County.
My mother lived in Baltimore County. I think she had a homestead act discount on taxes. Check online about that.
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Some counties have exceptions for people who are seniors or disabled with low income. You have to ask for the application or it may be online. I know that my cousin qualified one year. I know some other seniors who were low income and they got reductions too. For some disabled people, it's totally waived. This is in NC. It would depend on the laws in your jurisdiction. I'd check them out.
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Thank you so much for your kind responses
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a reverse mortgage might be the solution to the property tax woes
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Another option would be to sign up for subsidized housing.
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How delinquent are they? In Michigan, both summer and winter taxes must be 3 years' delinquent before a tax sale can take place. I've also been advised by a city rep that the county handles the tax sale foreclosure, then sells the house back to the city. I'm not sure if that's accurate, but it has been the situation for the abandoned house next door.

Hopefully the situation doesn't come to that, but there might also be an option for your friend to remain in her house as a tenant even after a tax sale. Cities would prefer to have houses occupied than vacant.

Also contact the treasury department for the county in which your friend lives and ask them how long taxes must be delinquent before foreclosure can take place.

You could also ask them about payment arrangements. Our community will accept monthly payments, although they're subject to a high interest penalty rate.

Another route is to search MD state agencies to determine if there's anything like what we have - the Elder Law of Michigan agency. It provides free legal information to income qualified seniors. If Maryland has something similar, you or your friend might be able to speak with an attorney about other options or what else might be available.

A tax or real estate attorney would probably be the best to advise if there are any other options.

Does MD have a property tax refund option through payment of state
taxes? Check that out as well, as some people in Michigan can get back up to $1K of their property taxes as a rebate.

Also, call the county and MD state bar associations or research online to find pro bono attorneys. Contact senior centers to see if they have attorneys who offer pro bono advice. You might be able to get some information that way as well.

Local congresspeople and senators might also be of assistance. Do some online research and see if you can identify any that are particularly interested in senior citizen issues.

Lastly, although this wouldn't be a first recommendation, there's a sale-leaseback option that might be considered beyond what I mentioned above through the county. Some investors might choose this option. My city at one point had from what I was told a few hundred vacant houses. One good landlord (but there are bad ones, for sure) takes good care of the rental properties. A rental would probably be more than a mortgage payment, if this woman is still paying on a mortgage, so that might not be feasible. But check it out.

This is one of the basic problems - if someone can't pay property taxes and can't keep the house, switching to being a renter could actually be more expensive. Rents are typically multiples of mortgage payments.

Good luck; I hate to think about someone living in fear of losing her home.

(Also, check your message board; I'm P'Ming another suggestion.)
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