I heard there's a program where we can get compensation caring for my Mom. Is that so?

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My Mother has Alzheimer's and I care for her. She's 85, I'm 56.

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Mallory: Great point! There is indeed a God just as Satan exists, too
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keep in mind God is watching over everything. so for the ultimate "compensation", do your very best (without ignoring your own needs). even if you don't think there is a God, hmm, what if you're wrong? what could it hurt, to behave as if there were a God?
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Many on this site have asked this question. As for myself, I was NOT GOING TO TAKE ANY OF MY MOTHER'S $1, 223 SS wages.
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Your mom could pay you out of her assets or your state might be one of ones that has some payment plan. If your mom pays you, make sure you have a Written Caregiver Agreement which specifies your work duties, hours, rate of pay, how often and in what manner you'll receive payment, how much notice before you or she can terminate your services, whether you can do other activities while on the job, etc. Also keep in mind you need to report all income on your tax return and she also will need extra insurance in case you're injured on job. Also consider use of your car versus use of her car and what would happen to whose insurance in case of an accident. For all of these details you may need an Elder Care lawyer to draw up the Agreement. If the state in which you reside offers Medicaid reimbursement for family caregiving hours, they will set this up and monitor payments, also witholding federal and state taxes, unemployment insurance, Social Security taxes, etc. I am not aware of any state Medicaid that reimburses family caregivers to the extent that it would replace a regular full time job-- very likely they would pay minimum wage or slightly higher for a couple hours, a few days a week. Medicaid will never pay in home services more than it will cost them (their rate, not the private pay rate) to have the senior in a facility . So, to sum up, you might get a tiny amount of "pay" from certain states.....but not enough to live on by any stretch of the imagination. If you receive other state benefits, your caregiver pay could mean your disqualification from your other benefits. If mom needs lots of help it may be time for facility care. See that Elder Care lawyer and get some help for your particular situation and state.
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That’s a very common question asking about being paid. Majority of grown children do not get paid for caring for their parent, unless the parent is financially able to pay from their own pocket. If a parent can afford to pay you, the parent might as well hire a certified trained caregiver allowing you to keep a full-time job.

If you live in the States, see If your parent qualifies for Medicaid, the State might allow a trained Caregiver come in to help for a couple hours. Also check to see if your State is one of those States that has a “Cash and Counseling” program to help you out, it‘s worth looking into. Note that each State has their own rules, regulations, and programs.

Also contact your county agency on aging for programs such as Case Management, Meals on Wheels, Adult Day Care, housing, care referrals, etc,... go to the website link below.... click on your State.... now click on the city/county. https://www.agingcare.com/local/Area-Agency-on-Aging

And please come back to the forums if you have any Caregiving questions, we would be more than happy to share our experiences with you, and give you ideas on what to do.
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