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A good cushion and barrier cream, plus alternating times in the chair to take pressure off.Pay particular attention to the tailbone area and right above it as this is most vulnerable to breakdown. If you make your own cushion and can't sew a cover, I would use a pillow case that is waterproof to protect the foam, and then put a regular pillow case that you use just for the chair over the waterproof one so you can wash it.
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p.s. In addition to his EASE alternating-air cushion during the day, he uses a ROHO overlay mattress (giant pockets of air) and then we don't have to turn him during the night.
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My 91-year-old dad is mostly in a wheelchair. He doesn't move around once he's in it. In early 2013 his skin began to turn a bad color. An alert caregiver at home noticed it. His dermatologist looked at his skin and said he was only a few weeks away from a bedsore.

We tried various cushions--egg crating, donut shaped, various other foam. We tried turning him at night. We even tried a ROHO cushion. Nothing was enough to resolve the problem and his skin continued to stay what the doctor called a "bad" purple color.

Then we got an ALTERNATING AIR cushion for his wheelchair and recliner. In a few weeks the (bad) purple on his behind turned to a much better color, and eventually back to his normal skin tone. That was three years ago. He's used the alternating air cushion ever since and his skin is still a normal color.

The alternating air cushion we got him is called the EASE cushion. It's sold by a company in Paradise, California. It's portable and we take it with us to doctor appts, restaurants etc.

For my dad, an alternating-air cushion was a lifesaver.
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For someone who must sit in a wheelchair all day, I suggest a Gerri Chair instead.
It is on wheels and reclines in two or three positions. My husband has one and we use the Roho cushion on the chair. He can sleep, sit up straight for meals (has a portable tray) or semi-recline. Again search out products on the internet.
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All major university hospitals have seating clinics so that the proper type of seating can be provided for a person who spends a lot of time in a wheelchair. If you do not have this, seeing a physical therapist for recommendations is a good start. Generally speaking, a wheelchair is for transporting, not for prolonged sitting. So if possible, at home, transferring to other chairs is recommended. If this person is employed, that is more difficult. Other things mentioned above, moisture, nutrition are all important considerations. Gel cushions are generally much better than foam cushions, but the proper type of cushion needs to match the patient and the chair. There are any variables. See a professional.
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I strongly agree with the possibility that insurance may not cover what you need, I'm on Medicaid and it seems like some programs just don't cover much of anything like they used to. If all else fails and you may just have to save up a little money each payday and just by the cushion out right out of your own pocket. Depending on where you get the air cushion will depend on the price. I got mine at a local medical supply store and only paid around 50 bucks for it, which really wasn't too bad. What I like about the Roho cushion is the fact you can also use it as a back support since it's adjustable. I should also mention that even if you don't have open tailbone sores, you can still get other pressure soreness in that area as well as surrounding areas. That's why I don't spend any more time in the wheelchair than absolutely necessary. The human body can only take so much pain before it involuntarily reacts, and I never want to be caught in a situation of having to be stuck in the wheelchair any longer than absolutely necessary because pressure soreness is very painful.
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There is a wheelchair cushion called a ROHO. It is wonderful for relieving pressure on the coccyx, pressure or bed sores. The cushion helps prevent skin breakdown, too. The cushion is like "floating air". Please obtain an RX for it - local medical supply stores sell them [at least in my state]. Several styles are available - you may wish to do a browser search for 'ROHO wheelchair cushion" and several sources pop up that describe the style and the way they work. Smart of you to think ahead -- those tail bone sores take so very long to heal. [Several online sites sell them as well. i'm not sure if Medicare covers the cost - but at least it's worth getting the RX for the specs/style that would best serve the amputee.] God bless !
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Air has the least pressure of all materials, so if you can get one with air as a component, (Roho brand) this is best, never get anything that is "cut out" at buttocks, etc. this just puts the weight somewhere else. Gel is the next least, and foam is the worst and foam also allow for heat build up. Agree you can look on amazon etc for these. A Dr script means nothing as Medicare does not pay for these. Roho makes a cushion with air and foam components that I have found works very well. Also doing pressure relief where some one gets off their bottom, either by changing positions as much as possible, or standing, etc.
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my go to store is walgreens.i hoe you have one near by..they carry alot of med supplies and the pad i got for my mom was the same the rehab got my mom and billed medicare $250. for i payed $45..same thing..they carry alot of good supplies.
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Chandra09: Go to "Disabled World"
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My Mom is 93. We have purchased and returned dozens of items. She has no collagen- skin and bone. (Also, my fiancee was an amputee- right leg below knee). What had worked remarkably well is : Application of Boudreaux's Buttpaste (any CVS or pharmacy should have) and a kiddie swim ring (not inflated all the way) from Dollar TREE. Buttpaste should run $14-19; swim ring $1.00. Mom has severe dowager's hump as well, so we use for her back too.
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How about a "donut?"A big circle ring you blow up and adjust the air in it till your comfortable...That would be fairly cheap but a "Roho"cushion would probably be the best.We had to get one for Mom and she Did get open sores on her hiney and the thing that worked best for healing those up was Medi-Honey and Dermagran patches like they use on burn patients.I hope you find the right thing that works for you all.Take care,Lu
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Yes, I strongly agree that Roho cushions are good, I have one myself. They're really not that expensive if you buy from the right place. I got mine for around 50 bucks. Mine came with a nice cover and adjustment instructions for maximum comfort. However, the human body still has physical limits where wheelchairs are involved. I've long since noticed how wheelchairs are just not made to be really all that comfortable because they're not supposed to be something you actually live in. Yes, there are various questions on the market, but the human body at some point is still going to experience pain and discomfort if the person stays in the wheelchair long enough. This is why I suggest getting out of it periodically and using alternate seating. If you stay long enough in any type of wheelchair, you're definitely going to have some level of pain and discomfort. I have lumbar arthritis, I should know because I must be off my feet much of the time in order to minimize the arthritis pain. Arthritis pain is bad enough without spending too much time in a wheelchair or even on a mobility scooter. I just can't stay too long on any kind of wheelchair without some level of pain and discomfort. Again, wheelchairs in general or just not designed with comfort in mind even though they may seem comfortable for a while. An elderly friend who since passed even had a custom cushion system on his power chair. We were checking that you're out when he first got it, and the foam was real good at first. After a while though, the foam starts breaking down to the point it's no longer comfortable. Even my friend had to get out of his chair and use regular seating or lay on his bed. Even the best wheelchair has it's limits where comfort is involved because wheelchairs are just not all that comfortable at some point or another. Even the best cushions out there will start breaking down at some point, which is really why you don't want to spend all day in any wheelchair. Wheelchairs are really originally built to get you around for short distances, not ride 100 mile trips and expect not to feel something from it.
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A good place to buy cushions is at a fabric store. You can cut the size desired.:)
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I bought my Dad a gel cushion and a medical sheepskin from AMAZON. They were very reasonably priced and worked well---they will fit in a wheelchair and you don't need a doctor,although it's possible Medicare will pay for them if a doctor orders them.I've worked in intensive care units for 37 years---that's what we use,as well as eggcrate mattresses and air cushions.The gel cushion and sheepskin are fairly inexpensive.Medical supply stores can make suggestions,too.My Dad had no body fat,so he was very prone to pressure ulcers,too---good luck! Rotating body position frequently helps---every 2 hrs or so.Amazon also has positional wedge cushions to help keep people from lying in the same position too long.
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Take a look at a medical supply store - ask for a Roho Cushion - or Google it - it's an air filled cushion. My husband has tried everything to take the pressure off of his coccyx, and has since developed pressure sores on his bottom, nothing has worked. This recommendation came from his wound care nurse.... be sure to get a prescription for it from your doctor, though - it is very expensive!
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Medicare msy not pay for a Roho but maybe private insurance. They r really nice.
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I think Roho cushions are good. They r expensive. They are made with pockets that you fill with air to your comfort level. Comes with a pump.
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It may be helpful for some to see the Wondergel products - they have their own website, but one can also get them on Amazon. Here is a picture of the "extreme" health cushion on Amazon - it fits neatly into a wheelchair, I have found. They originally designed these cushions to ease pressure for drivers and sports people sitting on hard seats in stadiums, but the design is really good, adds support, air, and cushioning, all in a washable cover. In addition to the extreme one - the original seat cushion is also great - for my last client who lost her mobility, I urged the family to order one of each, and they were good to interchange, use in the wheelchair, and on the bed, when the person was sitting in bed more. Wondergel-WG-EX-001-WonderGel-Extreme-Cushion/dp/B004CUHJSK

I don't work for Wondergel, (but they should reward me by now for my persistent recommendations in the healthcare field....!) but in my longterm role as responsible party for my disabled brother, I learned to experiment over time, and keep trying, until I found products that could work and yet withstand his large size and difficulties with mobility and planning, as well as years of work in elder care.
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Another good resource is an Occupational Therapist. In my experience, the Occupational Therapist performs the wheelchair "fitting" and I think they would have the broadest experience with wheelchair accessories such as seat cushions. I'm not sure, but you might have to ask around to find an OT who does wheelchair fittings. I would guess it's a specialty within OT.

Consider how much you anticipate the person will sit in the wheelchair. If they will be in the chair all day, you should buy the best one you can afford.

As others have said, incontinence can be an issue. My Dad's cushion wasn't waterproof (water resistant) and sure enough, it began to smell after repeated accidents with leaky Depends. I guess some urine got in the foam, probably seeped in through the zipper. Yuk.
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You should ask the doctor for an evaluation from a physical therapist. In addition to cushioning the buttocks, the lumbar will need support for preventing the lower back nerves from compressing. The patient will also need exercises to strengthen his core to prevent slouching, which will compress his spine, leading to lower back pain. To get you started, you can search Amazon for lumbar support cushions. I know for sure the bottom cushion is covered by insurance with proper documentation, but I don't remember if the lumbar cushion is.
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I again recommend the Wondergel products - they really are superior to the egg crate and foam cushions, probably almost as good as the air-shifting pads they use on beds, but because of the need for electricity, those may not be as good on wheelchairs.

Wondergel has several products, some thicker, some less, made with a gel that has flexibility, and filled with air pockets throughout.

No matter what product, it's good to change them a couple of times during the day - same effect as making sure you turn a body in bed, when the person cannot turn themselves. Changing the seat pad shifts pressure points.

And one thing to watch with the Wondergel products is the edges - the ones with very square edges, can create a ridge that irritates at that point, where others have more rounded edges, but those ones (the thicker pads) are in covers, and not as gently soft. Use several products, including wondergel, and rotate them, watching with each change, to guard against any one spot of pressure, like an edge - or even bunched sheet - over time, any bumps can add a pressure spot.
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You can get an "eggcrate" type of material that will cushion the bottom. Also one should move out of the wheelchair often if at all possible.
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No matter how good of a product you may use for someone in a wheelchair, at some point they're going to have some sort of discomfort or pain sooner or later. From experience with wheelchairs since I do use one due to low back arthritis, I can honestly say that the best remedy is just to get out of it and set it alternates seating
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A medical store sells cushions with a 200%-500% markup. My SO purchased one at a pharmacy that has medical products (He has no padding on his buttocks). He paid $59.99 for it. The very same cushion on Amazon was $19.77. Ask your doctor for a picture or online print of the type that would be best. Then go to Amazon and find one within your price range. Buy the best one you can afford. Also you might ask if your local store will match an Amazon price or come close it. It is your money, after all.
Cushions made with memory foam are effective because the foam is dense and returns to its original shape when no one is sitting on it. You actually can order plain memory foam cushions online and then make your own cover if you can sew. As the poster above said, be sure to purchase one that is appropriate for your mother's wheelchair.
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Yes i agree with others you can buy many different products seat cushions out there. The egg crate ones are great as the change the pressure points often. Also use a heavy barrier cream all the time. This will keep skin from breaking down. If there are any sores currently present make sure a doc or visiting nurse show you how to care for them as they can get quite nasty if not treated properly. If cost is a factor you can go to a craft store like joann fabrics and get great foam cut to exact size you need. However if on medicare or medicaid they will pay with doctors prescription
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Agree with the above posters. There are a ton of different types of wheelchair cushions out there for all different needs. If the person is mostly wheelchair bound it might be a good idea to go to a wheelchair clinic or a dealer that has the ability to do pressure mapping which helps them prescribe the best cushion.
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There are Temper-Pedic material made cushions that fit wheelchair seats perfectly. When you go into a medical supply store make sure you take the wheelchair as some wheelchairs seat areas are different dimentions. The cushions also come in different thicknesses so have them test it first.
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To take pressure of coccyx area.
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Yes, your parent needs protein #1. Ensure, Glycerna if a diabetic. I don't know their food intake. If they are a poor eater. I would recommend at least 3 servings a day. I would check a medical store. They can help you with a device for the wheelchair. Are they having problem with incontinence? They may need a barrier cream. I would check with MD for treatment to an open sore. May need to go back to bed in the afternoon to take
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