Is there a product that will assist comfort and prevent soreness to an amputee in a wheelchair? - AgingCare.com

Is there a product that will assist comfort and prevent soreness to an amputee in a wheelchair?

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A good cushion and barrier cream, plus alternating times in the chair to take pressure off.Pay particular attention to the tailbone area and right above it as this is most vulnerable to breakdown. If you make your own cushion and can't sew a cover, I would use a pillow case that is waterproof to protect the foam, and then put a regular pillow case that you use just for the chair over the waterproof one so you can wash it.
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p.s. In addition to his EASE alternating-air cushion during the day, he uses a ROHO overlay mattress (giant pockets of air) and then we don't have to turn him during the night.
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My 91-year-old dad is mostly in a wheelchair. He doesn't move around once he's in it. In early 2013 his skin began to turn a bad color. An alert caregiver at home noticed it. His dermatologist looked at his skin and said he was only a few weeks away from a bedsore.

We tried various cushions--egg crating, donut shaped, various other foam. We tried turning him at night. We even tried a ROHO cushion. Nothing was enough to resolve the problem and his skin continued to stay what the doctor called a "bad" purple color.

Then we got an ALTERNATING AIR cushion for his wheelchair and recliner. In a few weeks the (bad) purple on his behind turned to a much better color, and eventually back to his normal skin tone. That was three years ago. He's used the alternating air cushion ever since and his skin is still a normal color.

The alternating air cushion we got him is called the EASE cushion. It's sold by a company in Paradise, California. It's portable and we take it with us to doctor appts, restaurants etc.

For my dad, an alternating-air cushion was a lifesaver.
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For someone who must sit in a wheelchair all day, I suggest a Gerri Chair instead.
It is on wheels and reclines in two or three positions. My husband has one and we use the Roho cushion on the chair. He can sleep, sit up straight for meals (has a portable tray) or semi-recline. Again search out products on the internet.
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All major university hospitals have seating clinics so that the proper type of seating can be provided for a person who spends a lot of time in a wheelchair. If you do not have this, seeing a physical therapist for recommendations is a good start. Generally speaking, a wheelchair is for transporting, not for prolonged sitting. So if possible, at home, transferring to other chairs is recommended. If this person is employed, that is more difficult. Other things mentioned above, moisture, nutrition are all important considerations. Gel cushions are generally much better than foam cushions, but the proper type of cushion needs to match the patient and the chair. There are any variables. See a professional.
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I strongly agree with the possibility that insurance may not cover what you need, I'm on Medicaid and it seems like some programs just don't cover much of anything like they used to. If all else fails and you may just have to save up a little money each payday and just by the cushion out right out of your own pocket. Depending on where you get the air cushion will depend on the price. I got mine at a local medical supply store and only paid around 50 bucks for it, which really wasn't too bad. What I like about the Roho cushion is the fact you can also use it as a back support since it's adjustable. I should also mention that even if you don't have open tailbone sores, you can still get other pressure soreness in that area as well as surrounding areas. That's why I don't spend any more time in the wheelchair than absolutely necessary. The human body can only take so much pain before it involuntarily reacts, and I never want to be caught in a situation of having to be stuck in the wheelchair any longer than absolutely necessary because pressure soreness is very painful.
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There is a wheelchair cushion called a ROHO. It is wonderful for relieving pressure on the coccyx, pressure or bed sores. The cushion helps prevent skin breakdown, too. The cushion is like "floating air". Please obtain an RX for it - local medical supply stores sell them [at least in my state]. Several styles are available - you may wish to do a browser search for 'ROHO wheelchair cushion" and several sources pop up that describe the style and the way they work. Smart of you to think ahead -- those tail bone sores take so very long to heal. [Several online sites sell them as well. i'm not sure if Medicare covers the cost - but at least it's worth getting the RX for the specs/style that would best serve the amputee.] God bless !
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Air has the least pressure of all materials, so if you can get one with air as a component, (Roho brand) this is best, never get anything that is "cut out" at buttocks, etc. this just puts the weight somewhere else. Gel is the next least, and foam is the worst and foam also allow for heat build up. Agree you can look on amazon etc for these. A Dr script means nothing as Medicare does not pay for these. Roho makes a cushion with air and foam components that I have found works very well. Also doing pressure relief where some one gets off their bottom, either by changing positions as much as possible, or standing, etc.
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my go to store is walgreens.i hoe you have one near by..they carry alot of med supplies and the pad i got for my mom was the same the rehab got my mom and billed medicare $250. for i payed $45..same thing..they carry alot of good supplies.
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Chandra09: Go to "Disabled World"
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