Anyone have problems after joint replacements and anesthesia? - AgingCare.com

Anyone have problems after joint replacements and anesthesia?

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I need to get perspectives on any experience with going in for joint replacements, particularly hips. Over age 65 there is apparently an increased risk of delirium and being unable to return to previous level of function.

My mom was worse after she got a knee done, but she already had MCI for sure. She could have had an epidural and sedation like they did for her hip fractures, but she went with a general (her choice) instead and right after that was when I noticed some abnormal reflexes she did not have before, We hoped for getting her walking some, but ended up with that being extremely limited, though she had relief of pain with what she was able to do.

My hubby is 65 and may need something done someday, hips knees, or both, maybe sooner than later. He is heavy and we already have handicap plates because he cannot walk far and limps all the time. He's not afraid of going to the orthopedist per se but just does not get around to it, keeps taking meds and doing minimal exercise but I am starting to be afraid he will fall, and of course, it really limits what we can do together.

I'm 56 and because of my Mom I was scared to death of even brief general anesthesia just for a minor gyne procedure, but the guy sold me on it and post-op my brain seems to be OK.

Lots of folks nearer my age have gotten great results with knees...but hips...anything anyone can share?

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Well, its personal for sure now. Hubby has a bad left hip. Bone on bone, will probably set up for replacement this summer.
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I had a knee done last April, did two weeks in rehab with PT every day. I also had a recumbent bike at home and did 6 minutes 3 times a day. I would also sit in a wheelchair and "walk" the chair, backwards at first, then forward. To improve ROM, I would put my feet on the floor, and gently roll the wheelchair forward using my arms and allow the knees to passively bend under the chair, gradually increasing a little each day, until I could get to where the toes were pointing to the back. This took about 3 months to accomplish. If you can at least start her doing a little back and forth with her legs in a wheelchair or rocking in a rocking chair, it will help strengthen the calves and improve circulation. A wheelchair is a good exercise machine if you use it right.
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Thanks, P! I will have to pass that along to some folks I know, I had not realized you could even get that commerically. Hubby has not HAD a joint replaced yet, I'm more worried he will need to, and how will he handle the anesthesia? He did lose about 50 lbs down from over 300, to about 250-260 now, but has stalled out losing any more. He will walk short distances, and use machines at the fitness club briefly with low weights but is clearly not building any muscle. I have nightmares about him falling and my/our life being over. We do have a one story house with a generator just to give us a better chance of being able to stay safe and stay put longer term...thanks again!!
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Have bloodwork done to check for Cobalt in the bloodstream. The metal portion of the artificial joint is subject to wear, especially in a heavy patient. Blood cobalt levels higher than 20 mcg/L may be an early sign of problems with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants. Symptoms mimic dementia.
It is extremely important to get the excess weight off, if not before surgery, then after with diet and mild exercise, like swimming.
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On the plus side, hubby just scheduled a doctor's appointment for Tuesday. I'm going to have to run back and forth from work to get there with him. He has aches and pains in a new muscle or tendon every day, its scaring me.
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