I'm getting ready to move my mother in with us and I don't know how to prepare. How do I help her and deal with it myself?

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Natalie~ Moving your Mom in with you is a very noble act-as well as one that is extremely trying. I say this, as a formmer caregiver-who went thru an awful lot with my Own Mom.
There is much online to read asbout this as well. I strongly suggest that you and/ or other family members partake of the support offered by the Alzheimer;s Association-If you are NOT able to attend support meetings you may want to call them on their hotline_(800)2 72-3900. To prepare and adjust for this move-I would read up as much as possi ble about this disease-it's many stages-and what hurdles you may have to jump.. This is a very emotional time for all-and when the move is done-don't forget to take time for YOURSELF..as you will become more proficient in caring for your Mom.
Good Luck to ALL~(please get back to us on your progress-if possible)
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Why is your mother moving in? Her situation makes a huge difference in how you prepare. Do you need special safety features added to your house? Will she become part of your family? What will her expectations of you be? What will your expectations of yourself be? Have you thought out how this will affect your family and have you all discussed it so you don't have to deal with things on an emergency basis? Trying to anticipate and address all these things in advance will make it easier for you all.
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One thing that helped in the kitchen is to get it more organized. My father-in-law can barely see so I moved the plates & bowls to a shelf where he could find them easily, stacked bowls by size, plates are in a rack standing on their sides so they're easy to pull out. I have one silverware drawer for him stocked every day with 3 of each - knives, teaspoons, soup spoons and forks in divided silverware tray. Rest of the silverware is somwhere else. This isn't only for his convenience, it's for our health as well because he isn't very conscientious about clean hands and I would cringe when I saw him handling all the silverware, feeling around for whatever he wanted. His cereal, cookies, and crackers are on the shelf above the plates and bowls ... he doesn't ever try to fix himself something to eat other than getting snacks so this arrangement is adequate.
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I moved my mother in with my family 15 months ago and I am still adjusting my life. My mother was suffering from early demetia and would become nervous very easily. I moved as much of her things that I could (pictures, vases, special teacups etc to make her feel more at home in my house. Make sure to have a night lite in the bathroom because when she wakes at nigth (which all woman do) you don't want her to get hurt looking for the bathroom. The biggest hurtle will be accepting the fact that your life as you knew it may be over. Everything has to be planned around my mother but with practice everything can become routine and you get to help her in the time of her life when she needs it most. Just try to relax and take things as they come. If possible try to find a senior center near you that she can attend, gives her time away from you and you from her. Good Luck
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Well, first set up guidelines and a routine. Communication is key.. It will start off fine at first then become a little challenging. A couple of thoughts, will you be eating together? Is everyone working? is she retired? What is her DAILY routine and if you can keep that at stautus quo it will help her adjust quickly to her new surroundings and environment. I did this 5 years ago and wish there would've been a book or something .. took a HUGE amount of time for this adjustment for ALL of us including my dog. Best of luck to you and all I can say is communicate all the time.
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