How to prepare for discharge from rehab? - AgingCare.com

How to prepare for discharge from rehab?

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My 76-year-old aunt is about to be discharged from the rehab facility in a week or two after breaking her hip about two months ago and having surgery to repair it. We live together in my grandma's old house (she died over 20 years ago). I have described our relationship on here before so I won't repeat everything again. My question iswhat do I have to look forward to as far as her care from the broken hip recovery and the fact that she is also a stroke patient? I also have health problems (CP, ankle surgery last year, and glaucoma , among other things).I am mainly worried about possible emotional clashes due to my inadequate caregiving skills. I will probably be doing most of the care by myself because everyone else is working and I don't have a job due to retiring on disability ten years ago. (I used to have a part-time job but I had to give it up to take care of her).What do I have to look forward to as far as caring for her at home?

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Babe gives very good advice. She would do well in long term care and given all your issues you'd be much better off as well. My mom also had rehab after hip replacement. If your aunt comes home you will have to make sure the house is equipped with a potty chair over the toilet, grab bars anywhere she needs help moving around. Some sort of bed rail to help her in and out of bed and other aids deepening on her mobility. There will also be all the meds to keep straight. Care at home will be a huge job. Make sure you understand what you're getting yourself into.
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Have any of the discharge people suggested that she stay in long term care? Better socialization, professional oversite, easier access to doctor's and nurse practioners.?

If you are determined to have her come home, set up outside caregivers now, perhaps a bath aide. Will pt be coming in to give he follow on therapy? Usually, the OT will come to the home to advise about accessibility, safety.

Make sure you arrange for respite care so that you can get out. I'd say one full day a week is the minimum to maintain your sanity. And at least one extended, two weeks built into each year.

Please value yourself and the care you're providing.
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