My friend is not getting the care he needs, the POA is just waiting for him to die. What can I do?

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I have a friend 83 years old who in the last 6 months got really ill. At this time he is in a nursing home ,and got so much worse that he does not speak. I been visiting him for months but recently I was told that the POA (recently selected) would like no visitors . I am not able to check on his health even with the doctor that knows me because of the POA. I also found out that the POA have changed beneficiary to be the POA person. My friend is not getting the medical care he can afford . He has fallen few times. He is being tied to bed and nurses don't come for hours . The nursing home is of a poor quality and I know that all the POA is waiting for is for him to die.

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I agree with everything said. Call Adult Protective Services. This is not only misuse of funds. The nursing home is likely breaking a state law (depending on where the home is) by tying your friend to the bed. Physical restraints (and many chemical restraints) are no longer legal in most places. There are very specific things that can be done for safety, but I doubt that tying him to a bed is one of those.

Also, go to www.ltcombudsman.org and type in the Zip code of the home. You'll then find the contact who represents patients in the home. This ombudsman should be able to have this whole place looked into.

Thank you for caring so much,
Carol
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Contact Adult Protective Services I your area immediately. It is against the law for the POA to withhold funds necessary for care, needs, and comfort.
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I would speak with the long term care ombudsman, the number should be posted in the facility where residents, families and visitors can access. I would also contact adult protective services. You can also contact the licensing/monitoring agency that surveys that facility. You care about your friend so it's not unusual that you would be concerned regarding his care. Your friend is lucky to have someone to look out for him. People from the about agencies can investigate to make sure there is no abuse of power and that he is receiving the care he deserves.
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Here is some more found information in regards to that POA situation mentioned in your post.
The concept of the durable power of attorney was created in 1969 when the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws promulgated the Uniform Probate Code (U.P.C. § 5–501). Ten years later, the provisions of the code dealing with the durable power of attorney were modified and published as the Uniform Durable Power of Attorney Act (UDPA). All fifty states recognize some version of the durable power of attorney, having adopted either the UDPA or the Uniform Probate Code, or some variation of them. Versions of the durable power of attorney vary from state to state. Certain powers cannot be delegated, including the powers to make, amend, or revoke a will, change insurance beneficiaries, contract a marriage, and vote.
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A power of attorney allows a person you appoint – your agent or “attorney-in-fact” – to act in your place for financial purposes when and if you ever become incapacitated. A health care proxy (sometimes called a health care power of attorney or advance directive) is a document that gives an agent the authority to make health care decisions for you if you are unable to communicate such decisions.

While the health care proxy is the one who makes the health care decisions, the person who holds the power of attorney is the one who needs to pay for the health care. If the two agents disagree, it can spell trouble. For example, suppose your health care agent decides that you need 24-hour care at home, but your power of attorney thinks a nursing home is the best option and refuses to pay for the at-home care. Any disagreements would have to be settled by a court, taking time and draining your family’s resources in the process.
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No only call Adult Protective Services, but notify the Board that regulates nursing homes in your city to have them investigate your allegations of your friend being tied to the bed. This is usually illegal except in mental hospitals or if someone is sleep walking, confrontational, or hurting themselves. Kudos to you for wanting to help, however, the POA has all the power unless you can produce information/documents to prove they are unscrupulous.
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Equally worrying is the possibility that the NF is using the POA as an excuse to cover their lack of care. If it were me, I'd *first* try to contact the POA and see if that's their directive. S/he may not know, and I'd rather not create trouble for someone who doesn't deserve it. Second, I'd call the omsbudsman, then call APS. Calling APS is the ultimate solution, not the first one. Once APS is on a case, they're like dogs on a bone (rightfully so, where warranted), and can cause unremitting grief to innocents.
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Thanks LifeRyder for giving such concise and correct information.
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I agree: please call APS. This type of neglect is potentially dangerous nursing home and could be shut down for improper procedures and staffing.
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Thank you all for the info ---I did take the advice and called the authorities. Two days later I went to the nursing home to find out my friend died . No one notified me When I asked why? I was informed it was the POA will to make it private crimation , no service or anything . Very sad . I hope there is a place for people like them :( . Again thank you all. My only advice to others will be act right away. You might make a difference for your love one .
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