Can a POA stop bank statements from going to the person she is POA for? - AgingCare.com

Can a POA stop bank statements from going to the person she is POA for?

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He is alert, but had a stroke a few years ago. He needs moderate help with adl's, but is alert . She will not let him have bank statements for his accounts and refuses him access to his money.

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I won't hesitate, He comes first. I am here for him.
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Carla, you see abuse, you make the call. Do not delay.
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I am a live-in care giver for him and have also known him for 10 years. He worked the same job for 23 years, was never late on his rent the 10 years he lived in his own place, and had advance paid his utilities up to a year. He was never irresponsible with his money. She has been removed as a POA from 2 other relatives for similar reasons and accusations but he was not aware of this until recently.So it is not about blowing his money. He has always been frugal and had 3 401k's . He was a saver. This is a control issue. I can say this as a bystander that sees and hears all as a live in care giver.
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You may need a lawyer to sort this out, but if a POA is overstepping they should be stopped, and should be stoppable if there is no declaration of incompetence. Every POA document has some stipulation about the POA's duties and cause for removal as POA, and it may be considered a public document that you and Dad can access. Dad feels bad about going against his own sister and if her intentions are dishonorable she will take advantage of that.

That said, do ask yourself if she has done this to keep Dad from blowing all his funds on lotteries or scams, or giving it away to other family who have no right to it. If so, she may be doing exactly the right thing and Dad is smart enough to let her protect him, so you don't want to undermine that. If you ask her for an accounting of funds, be very tactful, because if she is providing all care for Dad and actually is trying to do right by him, it will be hard for her not to feel persecuted and unappreciated.
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He has not been declare incompetent. He agreed to a POA to get everything transferred from another state to where he resides now. Because he is physically disabled, he could not handle every thing by himself. I am asking because at this point he feels belittled and has increase depression over the situation. He did not expect to lose total control of everything he had, but he is afraid of making his sister mad. I will let him know what advice is given here, because I do not want involvement in his money or legal matters unless I see abuse, and if that happens, I will notify APS. Thanks everyone...
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If he hasn't been dwclared incompetent (i assume he we know that) he can request whatever and also instruct that poa not be notified. Make an appo in ntnent gor him to see his lawyer and bank manager, if he is still compus mentis.
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My interest in this is that I am his caregiver and see what is happening. I do not want to overstep my bounds. I have tried to stay out of it, but at some point when is enough enough?
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It is his sister, and his family has a history of stealing from him. She has bullied and threatened to send him to a nursing home. He is physically disabled but mentally fit. He agreed to her as poa because his last one was stealing from his accounts. He is afraid to do anything because of her threats, yet he wil not bring in a social worker or mediator because it is his sister.
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By "alert" I assume you mean mentally capable? Is there some reason he doesn't go down to the bank and request copies of his statements? If he is mentally and physically capable then it is his choice to allow his poa to act for him. If he is unhappy he can change his poa, but I assume he trusted this person enough to appoint her in the first place. Perhaps he was happy to be relieved of the burden of dealing with everyday finances. Perhaps he has a history of spending unwisely. What is your interest in this?
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  • Two common scenarios are when a caregiver no longer wishes to be POA and when a family member wants to challenge the legality of a POA’s actions. Changes are dependent on the principal’s competency, how the document is written and the desired outcome.
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