In PA the existing Executor of the will, POA, has to sign off on the new will. Does that still apply now that mom is in NY?

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My sister had my mother change her will, POA and Executor, to her after my mother moved in with her without my knowledge. The will was written in Pennsylvania. After my father passed 10 years ago, my mother moved to New York and alternated living with my sister and me. She developed dementia over the years. She is now 87. She went to visit my sister last Christmas (who hasn't spoken to me in over 30 years because she thinks I received more than her and was the "chosen one".) We had the same opportunities in life. It's what you make of it. She is 68 now with no income except her husbands retirement, which isn't much. She had my mother sign over POA and assigned her to be Executor of her will. My mother has no clue why she actually did this, besides to say it's what she wanted to do. My sister has closed my mother's checking account. I have no idea where my father's retirement now goes or what she does with it. I have not seen my mother since she left. I call several times/week and no one returns my calls. My mother's cell phone has been taken away from her, so I have to leave a message on my sister's answering machine. No one has spoken to my mother in 1 1/2 years except for her one sister who refuses to tell me anything. She says she wants to stay out of any family business. My mother writes an occasional letter and says she's very happy there and will not move again. One question that I have, among many others, is, was it legal to change my father's and mother's joint will (written in Pennsylvania and now changed in NY). I know in Pennsylvania the existing Executor of the will, POA, has to sign off on the new will. Does that still apply now that she is in NY? I am desperate to get my mother back safe and sound. Now knowing what is going on with her is the worst part.

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I have been the Executor of the will and have had POA for 20 years. I did receive a copy of my mother's change of POA and Executor of her will from her new attorney. I spoke with my attorney about this and he said the same thing. No self respecting attorney would draw up a new document if the person is demented. However, I'm sure my sister did all the talking and arranging. My mother can answer most questions appropriately if she has been coached. I did not have her worked up for dementia since I was taking care of her and had POA. I knew I had the power to do what was best for her.
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Hooterbear, I assume you hear about the new Power of Attorney from your Mother, correct?  If your Mom has had dementia over the years, maybe your Mother got things confused and she didn't sign a new POA.   If your Mom didn't tell you, who did? 

Did your sister take Mom to an Attorney to have this done?   If yes, no attorney would have allowed a person who has memory issues sign a legal document that they don't understand.

Have you contacted the person who was named Executor for the Will and POA that was drawn up in Pennsylvania?   Did that person say there is a new Will. Usually the new Attorney will notify the previous Attorney, and the Attorney will notify the Executor if the firm can find that person.

As for a joint Will, sorry I never heard of one. Maybe someone else on the forum has.
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