My step brother who has POA said I was no longer welcome. Will the nursing staff have to report what they saw to their supervisor?

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I went and tried to visit with my dying mother however my step brother who has POA said I was no longer welcome at her home. Someone had reported him for elder abuse recently and he insists that I had called. While I was there a nursing staff was there giving him instruction's on how to give her medication. He was highly agitated that I was there. Told me that I was no longer welcome there and then when I said I had every right to see my mother he told me to leave. He then acted like he was calling the police by the way they never showed up. The nursing staff tried to calm him down however he kept saying that he had POA and he didn't want me there. Will the nursing staff have to report what they saw to their supervisor as I'm pretty certain they were there on the behalf of Protective Services.

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Windy is correct regarding the scope of POA responsibilities- it all depends on how it was written. I was DPOA for my mother and had both financial and healthcare - and many other decision making rights and responsibility. My mothers DPOA document was extreamly long and detailed- it even included the care of her cat!
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The op states that it is the mother's home.
It is a red flag that her son was reported for elder abuse.
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Hard to tell from the original post what is actually going on in this situation but many POA documents will include medical, financial and all other matters and decisions the grantor of the POA would have normally exercised. It's my understanding That would include who is allowed to care for and visit the elder.

As POA for my folks I would not hesitate to keep someone away from them if I felt it was harmful in any way to their well being. I don't know if that is the case here however.
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Nancy, the fact that he is POA has nothing to do with this situation, It is extraneous information, The issue is that he owns the home and can decide who may enter and who may not. He chooses not to let the OP in.

I do agree with having someone check on her welfare but the police are not the ones to do it. Unless the situation is obviously harmful or abusive, they don't really have the training to handle this. They would most likely only file a report with APS. I think that is where you should start. Make a call and have them send an investigator.
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I don't see how the POA can stop someone from seeing a person. Being a POA is only the financial part, not about the health decisions etc. In fact, once the person dies, the POA no longer has any power at all. I think maybe I'd call the non-emergency police number and say you'd like a 'well being' check done on your mom. If your step-brother is having trouble dealing with the responsibility of taking care of your mom, hopefully they will see that. Good luck.
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The nurses were probably there from hospice, I don't believe APS sends nurses, only investigators.
It is unfortunate for you that your mom lives with your step brother because he has every right to decide who can enter his home. I think your best hope is to try to find a third party to mediate and find a way to set up some visiting hours for you. Whatever the back story is here, the number one priority is respecting the needs and wishes of your mother, you both may need to compromise and eat some humble pie in order to make that happen.
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