As POA, if I have to sign mom into hospital, will I be legally responsible for her bill?

Follow
Share

Mom with dementia can sign her name presently. However, as her disease progresses, this may not remain true. I have POA for both legal and healthcare purposes. Would this make me legally responsible for her bill if she was unable to sign herself into the hospital in the event she had to be admitted?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
35

Answers

Show:
1 2 3 4
If she has dementia, even if she is physically able to write her signature, she is not legally competent to make the decision to enter a hospital. You would only be required to pay the bills out of her funds.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

How do you find a "Reputable Elder Care Lawyer" My daughter , who is a lawyer in another state researched the lawyers for me and found me one, Only thing was he was a rip off artist. He charged me $1000 for a new will when I already had a legal will in another state. Another lawyer told me that was not necessary and he only did it to get the $1000. We were at her office to write a POA and HPOA for my brother in law. She was so reasonable and helpful, although she was not an "Elder Care Lawyer." I am afraid to go back to the first lawyer because of his deceitful practices.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I live in NE and am my mothers POA. It was explained to me that I sign my mothers name, then mine, and POA after it. That way, mom is responsible and not myself. But I will be sure to read the fine print from now on also!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

No. You are signing "in place" of your mother. That is all you are doing. A signature does not entail ownership, unless you did something illegal, immoral or dangerous to her. Even though she can "sign" her name at this time, does not make it legal. She has to be "competent" to sign a document and fully understand it. Medicare and other insurances will usually pay for in-hospital stay, but don't worry about it until or IF it happens. Just enjoy her for the time she has left. Best wishes.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

When my mother entered the nursing home I signed a piece of paper (given to me by the nursing home) stating that I am NOT financially responsible for her bills. I would bet that the same applies here.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This is my understanding, if you have POA and your parent is not incapacitated mentally you can help him handle his financial affairs by paying his bills for him as his POA, you are not responsible for his bill. When he becomes deemed mentally or medically incapacitated and documented as so then the enduring power of attorney comes into effect after it is registered with the court, that is how it is in Ireland, I would assume that is a DPOA in USA and probably works the same way. In any event, you pay the bills, etc for him, you represent him in his affairs as if he was doing them himself. You are not responsible for his bills.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

The "Tricky" will go away if you hire a reputable Elder Law Attorney.
Or... you could get this accurate info & proof from your Probate Court directly without cost.
Please don't rely on 'here says ' for this very important information.
Best wishes.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Now I am confused. I assumed that only his money was used for hospital bills. I will have to consult my lawyer now to see if I am responsible too. He has enough to last a little while, but not for too long. I have just about 0 in my account so I cannot pay his bills. This is getting tricky.
I live in MD.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

She has insurance, it won't fall on you!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I also have both ,POA and health surrogate. My fathers lawyer told me that I would not be responsible for his bills. I would just be acting for his benefit.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

1 2 3 4
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.