Does POA have authority to fire a caregiver?

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I am the POA for my father. He had a caregiver for about two years which was working out fine. In the last few months he has needed extra help (bathing, etc.) so the doctor recommended a new caregiver who comes several times a week. From the day the caregiver started there have been a number of issues. Money has gone missing from my fathers apartment, she left the stove on and he burned himself, and there have been a number of other issues. Last night after a new issue arose (long story) I decided to fire her. It wasn't something that I took lightly but I believed that it was in his best interest not to allow this woman back into his apartment. I called my sister to let her know, and she got into a huge argument with me. I am the POA for my father, and she told me I don't have the authority to fire her. I am not sure why she she wouldn't be on my side, but the entire situation began an epic fight. Do I have the power to fire a caregiver if I believe she is not suited for my father's care?

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Forgot to say: I should think your sister was alarmed partly because you took the decision without consulting her (not that you have to, but why wouldn't you if she's normally involved), and partly because of the new caregiver's tie-in with your father's doctor, which could lead to an awkward conversation or two.

Try not to let it worry you. The stress of caregiving, and sibling relationships, and wielding POA are all notorious for creating conflict out of nowhere, and out of all proportion to the subject at hand. I hope you'll be able to kiss and make up; but in any case once you've got the facts clear stick to your guns.
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I would say it is your responsibility to fire a caregiver you reasonably believe to be detrimental to your father's wellbeing.

Just... Things going missing. The stove left on. These would be characteristic behaviours in a person with dementia: are you absolutely certain that this caregiver is responsible? Also, consider that the upset of having a new person around the place could have been a setback for your father's mental state - it wouldn't be difficult to see how he might be more confused until he got properly used to her.
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IES130, is there any way of getting the original caregiver back since she was with your Dad for two years? Then you can hire a bath only person who can come in a couple times a week, or daily just to bathe your Dad.

Now this can be tricky, if your Dad has Alzheimer's/Dementia there are times when the patient makes up stories. Maybe it was Dad saying these things so he can get back the original caregiver.
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Yes, you did the right thing if the caregiver was not trustworthy and not doing a good job. Did you hire her through an agency or as an individual? If it was through an agency, the best thing to do is let the agency handle it and choose another caregiver for your dad. If you hired an individual, I hope you are able to find a good replacement quickly. I don't understand why your sister objected.
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I would think that since the caregiver is being paid, then paying them or not paying them would be a financial decision - therefore under your purview. I hire all of my mother's caregivers and if it comes up, I would not hesitate to fire any one of them.

I can't understand why your sister would want to keep a bad caregiver though.
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