Is it possible for an Alzheimer's patient to become more lucid for a short period of time. Does that happen occasionally with Alzheimer's? - AgingCare.com

Is it possible for an Alzheimer's patient to become more lucid for a short period of time. Does that happen occasionally with Alzheimer's?

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That happened with my husband. He was completely like himself for about six hours and then reverted back to his Alzheimer's symptoms.

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I personally learned that when alzheimer people are removed from their normal surroundings such as home into ie: rehab, hospitals etc the Alzheimer's disease gets aggravated. The confusion gets worse.
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Yes. No doubt. I deal with that with my Grandma. A couple times this morning alone. Yesterday she had been admitted to the hospital for malnourishment and dehydration. While we were there, she didn't have a clue. She thought she was still in her bedroom, and that the nurse had been a waitress. Didn't recognize me or my Mom. We got home around 8pm, which is super later for her. She normally goes to sleep at 5, not to mention she had been up since 6:30. She should have been more than exhausted, however I couldn't get her to go to sleep until almost 4 am. After a huge fight with her, to keep her from running away with 60 mph winds blowing,he became "Normal" Grandma again, and calmed down enough to fall asleep. 4 hours later she was crying, kicking, and screaming thinking that I had kidnapped her, and that she wanted to go back to the island to be with my Grandpa. (We live in Nevada. No islands around us. My Grandpa died 5 years ago.) Finally got her calmed down, again. All night long she didn't remember she had been in a hospital all day. However, after calming her down, she returned to "Normal" Grandma again. She looked at me and started crying, begging me not to take her to the hospital again. It's just the way Alzheimer's works. It's a very tough job, and I applaud you. Keep up the great work, and keep us updated on him please.
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I am sooo glad I read some of your answer's because I have experienced this with my husband and thought, Am I imagining this disease??? Is he schitzophrenic? Thanks for the insight!
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Yes. Certain hrs of the day are better than others. Social engagement or being outdoors can renew the spirit and they can engage especially one on one vs group. It's a roller coaster as above says. Relish all the wonderful moments as they become less frequent over time.
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Yep. Just enjoy those random lucid moments. Grandad was like this, you never knew who you were visiting--Grandpa or the man who was now walking around inside his body. If he recognized me one day, and not another, I just took it in stride.
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I have witnessed this return of function with my LO. She has Vascular Dementia (possibly AD too.) and we were ready to call Hospice a couple of weeks ago. She was going very down hill, but, after she left the ER, she returned to the MC unit and made a miraculous turn around. (Still Last stage, but, much better.) She's eating, drinking and has started using her hands in some ways better than a year ago! It's almost impossible to believe, but, I have read about this before, so I am prepared for her to go back down.

It's really ironic, today, I showed her a photo of her and one of her favorite singers, taken backstage at a concert.(1993) I asked who the singer was and she KNEW his first and last name! (Keep in mind that she hasn't known her own name for the last 6 months.) I pointed to her in the photo and she didn't know who that was. She said, it's a person close by. I'm not sure what to make of that.

We just never know what to expect. I do hope that she stays at this level until she passes away. I do hope that she doesn't get bed bound and is not able to communicate at all.
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I did enjoy it and we had a wonderful day; however, when I realized what had happened I have been very sad since then. It is like it is trying to trick you into believing that you have your loved one back.
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Yes, it does. Sometimes it can go on for days and we think there's some improvement. It's almost like a brain pathway has re-formed. However, function goes back down soon. It can feel like a roller coaster after a while. It leaves us guessing about how advanced it is and what plans we need to make.

There is one good thing -- We can enjoy the good days while they last.
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