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Parents recently changed POA will & Trust. I made sure they & I have originals in fireproof lock boxes. Also made photocopies for their bank (they also had to fill out the bank's own forms). I mean, I wouldnt want the former POA /executer/ Trust person to be contacted after death. I hope someone has experience with this. I am not trusting the former POA, they never handed over all their records or the blank checks!

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Freqflyer, yes it would seem the natural thing to just pick up phone and call the attorney BUT for that would start the meter running and money is a concern. I wish there were a list of "best practices" to do.....and not have to go running to the attorney for every single simple question. To my mind there is little need for expensive lawyers in simple matters. Parents want to change a name on their documents, should be a matter of having someone retype & get it notarized (cost $18, but sending courtesy copy to lawyer to "file" cost $85.....am I crazy or is that simply ridiculous?). Lawyers could be a whole lot more helpful, should say upfront, on ways people can control their bills.
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Yes my parents did work with their original attorney, and that office did already send the Revocation to the former POA. But the old POA never shared any paperwork or even any help whatsoever of records they still have, nor did they day they shredded them or anything. Makes me worried that all parents account numbers, Soc Sec numbers, etc are all sitting in someone else's file cabinet or computer. Plus, they still have on-line access to the bank and also the investment accounts! Not that I am doing anything unusual for my parents. But it just bugs me that the former POA still has all the access they ever did have. I would think a bank or investment firm would automatically issue a new account number and require new log-on for computer access. Maybe I should ask for that but I don't want to make excess work.
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Who needs copies of the Will/Trust/POA's? Best thing to do is to ask the Attorney who drew up said documents, then that way if someone complains they didn't get a copy you can say the Attorney said only so-and-so gets copies.

If you are using a new Attorney, the new Attorney will send *notice* to the previous Attorney that said documents in his/her files are now void.
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Send copies to the former POA, so they do not make the error of thinking they still have responsibilities of paying bills, doing the taxes or managing any of the accounts. I hope you are working with an attorney on this, it can end up being challenged in court.
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