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I recently obtained a guardianship for my 89-year-old mother who has Alzheimer's. She is in complete denial and very angry when I try to have any conversation about the dementia and the changes that are coming. She won't leave her apartment except to walk a mile away to the grocery store to buy cigarettes. I am not able to go through her papers because she will not let me without hitting me. She will not get in the car for a doctors appointment and so I am even worried about how to place her in a nursing home if she will not physically get in my car. I feel like my only option is to call and ambulance service for non emergency to take her anywhere which is quite expensive and that will be under force. She is so paranoid about going anywhere with us because we had to trick her to get her in the car to go to the longevity center to be officially diagnosed. So because of this I cannot trick her again to leave the premises. I know that I have the legal right to make these choices for her but was wondering if anyone else has gone through this particular problem that has received legal guardianship.

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I just want to wish you minimal trauma over doing the right thing for your mother. We all know that doing something against the wishes of a person with dementia is often absolutely necessary for their well-being.
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I am sorry to say, but there may not be a way to do this with grandmas' approval. She sounds like she will fight tooth and nail.

So...are you prepared to have to force her? Get the sheriff to help. Is there such a thing in your area as "marshals of the court"? They can be called on to help.
Or, hire a couple of large guys to do this.

But..this is not going to be done in a manner that will not be traumatic to both you and grandma. Brace yourself. Or...hire a person to implement this, and you stay away until after it is done. Then..blame "those people".
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I would consult with an attorney who is experienced in such matters and who has handled this kind of thing before. With legal authority, law enforcement should be able to help you, though you may need an order signed by a judge.  I would explore what placement would be proper. Her doctor may be able to advise if she needs a Secure Memory Care facility. 
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Call the sheriffs department in your area and ask if they can assist you. They may require a judges order which you should be able to get since you have guardianship. The can tell you which judge etc. The sheriffs department may be able to restrain her while you gather her papers if you need those to find her a care facility. Is it her financial records that you need? I assume you have the medical records as you gained guardianship. Could you ask the store where she buys cigs to call you when she shows up? That should give you a window of opportunity.
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I'm hoping that others with more experience will chime in soon. But the fact that you have guardianship, I believe, means that you can force (and use the authorities, like the police) to force her removal to a psychiatric facility or a nursing home.

Has she seen a geriatric psychiatrist? It always seems to me that if the psych meds are straightened out, the rest of the process always becomes easier.
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