Do people with diabetes have mood swings and more negative thoughts than non-diabetic people?

Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
12

Answers

Show:
i better go to doctor, I get mood swings, and I love sugar...... :(, My kid says I can't remember the freaking grocery list, in my head or leave it at home, or the word -juice, when I'm there.....i'll probably follow my moms footsteps...yikes...
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Often we think of menopause or bipolar disorder first when we consider mood swings but other conditions, including diabetes, can cause mood swings. If the behavior is new, look for new stressors. Stress can be positive and negative. Have there been changes in the medication? After 15 years you would think he would have the meds down but diabetes is a progressive disease and he may have some changes in his blood chemistry he isn't aware of. If he has started taking a walk, eating fewer complex carbs, eating more veggies and healthy protein, he may not need as much medication. If your relationship is one where it is appropriate, go to his next dr visit with him. Diabetes is a family concern since it involves food, exercise, eating on schedule and eating healthy. If he has problems with hearing and has new meds he may not be taking his meds correctly. Some meds are time sensitive. You must take them before or after you eat etc. and if taken incorrectly can cause the blood sugar to swing and also the mood. Take a look at his bp, his bmi, and source of fats in his diet. Dr David Perlmutter is an expert for this site and along with many others believes that diabetes and Alzheimer's are related. Check out his recommendations and his book Grain Brain. He's an award winning neurologist and a nutritionist. Your suspicion about the mood swings and the diabetic connection may or may not be correct but learning about diabetes is a good idea when your partner is diabetic.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Mood swings can come from a variety of causes. Any sudden apparent change in personality/behavior that persists should be checked out medically.

Does your husband recognize that he is short-tempered? Does he calm down and apologize? Would he cooperate with getting a check up?

How well managed is your husband's diabetes? Is it time to have that checked? When was his latest A1C? I'm not aware that blood sugars in a well-managed range cause mood swings, but highs and lows can change how one feels (at least for me) and that in turn can make one "crabby."

Depression also causes mood swings. Fortunately, depression is treatable if it is diagnosed.

Lots of different things could be going on here. A thorough medical exam would be a good starting point for figuring it out.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

el chapo not being able to get a sound nights sleep in prison -- that was slightly crazier i guess .
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Angelkw
ive heard crazier things but i haveta say , not much crazier .
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Don't sugar crystals dissolve readily?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

There is a connection between diabetes and vascular dementia.

Here is the best way I can think to explain it. Sugar is a crystal (think of how it looks close up, angular, with sharp edges, squareish). When in your blood, especially when the sugar level is too high, that sugar is like having tiny razor blades flowing throughout your body. The sugar cuts into the arteries and veins it flows through, slashes the tissues in organs (particularly the kidneys) causing scarring and hardening of the arteries (Atherosclerosis). Over time, the damage the interior of the body grows and grows, inflammation and scarring overtakes, which eventually resulting in the part of the body becoming irreparably damaged (such as when renal failure occurs, or when a heart attack happens from the hardening of the arteries of the heart). The brain is not immune to this. Just as with the rest of the body, when the blood flows through the brain with too much sugar (too many razor blades) the capillaries and arteries of the brain being to harden, can break down, clot, and cause strokes. The reduced capacity and the reduced ability for the brain to receive oxygen causes vascular dementia.

Because of this link, it can be said that mood swings due to vascular dementia can be connected to diabetes. There have been medical studies that have proven a correlation (though not yet causation) of diabetes and dementia.

Angel
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

My mom was like that, she was in beginning stages of dementia. Not saying your husband is but it would not hurt to talk to his doctor.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

He is 72. When he gets angry he brings up the hurtful things from the past. Can't seem to let go.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Tempers and other bizarre behaviors can happen when there are swings in blood pressure. A friend of mine with a diabetic husband said she can always tell when his sugar goes low because he starts getting crazy. She asks him if he's checked his sugar.

How old is your husband?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.