Do you pay your caregiver for time off? - AgingCare.com

Do you pay your caregiver for time off?

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I hired a full time care giver to live in with my father. She requested to have 2 or 3 days off each month in a row. I agreed to this. However, now she is requesting to be paid for the time off. She has only worked for us for 3 months now. When she is off, I have to pay someone else to watch Dad or I have to stay with him and then my family & work suffer. Is there a standard or policy in the State of Illinois that says you are supposed to pay care givers for time off?

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I guess I am still not clear about this situation.... does she get time off during the week???? No paid caregiver is going to work 24/7 for a month....or at least I wouldn't.....and not have time off....

Do you give her a set paid wage for the month or pay her by the hour??? I'm confused.... if she is getting paid for the time she is there, then NO, she doesn't get paid for extra days off....

But I do appreciate Maggies words !!!! I have worked 12 hr shifts ,5 days a week and am exhausted and my body is so tired.... hurt my back and had to call in....only for one night..... then sucked it up and went back the next night.... what a beautiful gesture if I was paid for that sick day.... but am not keeping my hopes up..... have finally gone to only 4 nights , killing myself.... for what???
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Illinois does have laws for companion caregivers:
Domestic workers who work 7½ hours or more in a row are entitled to a 20-minute paid meal break no later than 5 hours into the shift.
Domestic workers are entitled to at least 24 consecutive hours of time off in every calendar week, usually Sunday. A worker cannot be required to work on a Sunday (or another designated day of rest) but can voluntarily agree to do so. If any worker has agreed to work on a Sunday, the employer should post a schedule in the workplace designating an alternative “day of rest” for the worker.
Employers who violate these provisions may be fined.
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Further thought...if she's really good and you're pleased with her services, perhaps you could give her quarterly bonuses instead of paying for time off.
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I don't think it's typical for independent contractors to get paid time off. But Maggie makes a good point.

How long has she worked for you and have you had others before that?
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Unlike others here, I value a superior care-giver. They're hard to find. If I was happy with this woman...if I could trust her...if my mom liked her...if she's working 24/7 on and on, and she wanted a day (or two) off a month with pay? I'd give it to her.

Penny wise. Pound foolish. I think people should keep that in mind.
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No work=No pay
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You don't pay her any money that she doesn't work! what's wrong with her??? My suggestion would be hire another C/G, let's them work out off days.
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She was found through an agency, but she is self-employed, she pays her own taxes, including SS. The agency representative says that we do not have to pay for days off.
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That's an interesting question. The full-time caregiver we had for a family friend a few years ago received $5,000 a month for 24/7 care. When he was off, which was most weekends, someone stood in for him. This was through a service, though. I imagine it's comparatively expensive; but I wouldn't hire a moonlighter to do 24/7 care for my mom for all the money in the world. No insurance...Labor laws may (or may not) apply re 8-hour days and over-time, etc. Withholding and paying Social Security, unemployment, etc., etc.

Sorry, I don't have any particular advice. Just some worrisome thoughts.
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We are paying her for full-time care. She has requested 2 to 3 months in row off each month, which we are OK with, but do not want pay for those days she is off.
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