Patients whose insurance ends for Rehab have no recourse but to remain in bed of the rest of their lives. What can be done? - AgingCare.com

Patients whose insurance ends for Rehab have no recourse but to remain in bed of the rest of their lives. What can be done?

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People who have had strokes, seizures and other problems who only have medicade and are doom to a life in bed in a nursing home. Help

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Hi captain, per your response, "...what sticks in my head is a statement gorbachev made a few years ago..."

I'm not sure I'd go that far. I would prefer socialized medicine because it's the humane thing to do. That said, I'm beyond cranky that it seems as if our own government didn't truly spend time to look at other countries who already had it and learned from their mistakes before they installed Obamacare.

The following won't solve any problems addressed here, but it's interesting to see what's going on in other countries regarding this issue. If this site will allow me to post a link to this article: "Dementia: I don't want a £55 'bribe' to diagnose patients" by Britain's paper The Telegraph. telegraph.uk/health/healthnews/11222003/Dementia-I-dont-want-a-55-bribe-to-diagnose-patients.html If this site doesn't allow posting links, it was posted 6:10AM GMT 11 Nov 2014.

Not only was the article interesting, but the reader responses were just as informative, if not more so. The link for the responses is just above where the article begins.
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everyday8 I feel your pain. I don't know the system of the in an outs of the medicare system but it is not for the people that work to make this country what it is today. If you are young and all ways getting in trouble and having kids that the system has to take care of then you might get medicade and live the America dream no job and no responibale . I know my spelling is not that good but I think you will get what I am trying to say.
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This month I received the notification from the NH about the 100 day coverage exhaustion of Medicare. Very short answer: the NH placed him in what they call restorative services. What it means? They take him out of bed and with nurse's help make him walk around the facility.
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ive witnessed this firsthand . my aunt is wasting away in nh and no muscle rehab can be done until medicaid kicks in . i admittedly dont understand economics either regional or global but what sticks in my head is a statement gorbachev made a few years ago . " the way forward will have to be a blend of capitalism and communism " . capitalism has been caught with its pants lying around its ankles and just hasnt the fortitude to admit it yet .
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I too am at this stage so a lady came out today. She is going to get hospice for my mom. This has been a long road for me and her. So try to get a social worker to work with you
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Jesus1: You gave no details so our ability to help is limited. Please understand that we cannot avoid the inevitable.
That being said; our healthcare system is extremely broken. Medicare allows money monger doctors to bilk the system and run a puppy mill/geriatric revolving door with our tax dollars. They prolong life without quality as a means to their financial ends.
Recently after having voiced this to a doctor after 16 years in caring for my mother and being a reluctant witness to their treatment of her as a cash cow, I was all of a sudden called by a resident doctor and subsequently the head of geriatrics at the hospital. I was then told my mother should have been in hospice long ago. What is one supposed to do with information like this?
How can I possibly believe that all is anything but inherently corrupt?
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Yep, everyday8. I hope when the time comes that I will still have the means and where-with-all to end my life on my own terms. It's very hard - beyond hard - to watch others fall to dementia and its various forms.

I am not going to follow that path even if it means setting a path many frown upon.
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Buster57, you are so right. My dad was in a nursing home, and getting rehab, which he really enjoyed. He improved to the point where he could walk with a walker, but that wasn't a good enough improvement, I guess they felt he should be able to run a five mile race. His rehab was stopped, and he was lucky if he was walked 20 ft. once a day after that. I realize they are short staffed, but its no excuse for the price they charge each month.
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Isn't this sad that we find out the ins and outs of the system a little too late? THAT is part of the system that is failing our loved ones (and us...who are running ragged trying to keep up with care AND the roller coaster and dead ends of health care and help that is available). My husband is a victim of the 'sorry, your rehab is over'. He has primary progressive MS and needs PT to stave off this horrible disease. Any progress he makes can only be maintained through continuous PT. Won't go into the whole story. Too long, too sad, too frustrating. Because of the flawed system, he went from being independent in a power chair to needing a patient lift to get out of bed, a cathater. Even though I did all I could to keep up with the insurance company, the doctors, the evil care he was getting at the AL facility...in 9 weeks, my pleas were ignored and they treated him like he was insignificant. He ended up being over-medicated, sent to ER in stroke-like condition. Fortunately, it was not a stroke. I was fortunate to find a place for him in a senior living care group home. He is now being cared for by angels. A stark difference. He even has the twinkle back in his eyes. Between the progression of the MS and the lack of care he had for so long, I'm not sure anymore if he can make it back to being independent and it breaks my heart. I still feel a little like I should have done more...all the while knowing that I did everything I could and that if the health system were more up front with its care, I wouldn't have been on a treadmill trying to catch up with every move that was made, doctors that didn't know his case, indifference of healthcare (Medicare provider), rules about this and rules about that. A vicious circle and the poor guy suffers.
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wwpwin, all it required was for one person (NICE, of course) to help her take a shower, get dressed and put on medicine and a bandaid. I did it myself. It took less than 30 minutes even for a newbie - far less for those who've gotten used to it and yet her insurance sent THREE people to do it. I would've keep doing it, but I don't live close enough to make it practical. Oi.
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