Can a patient be asked to leave a memory care facility due to aggression, anger, and other bad behavior with no notice? - AgingCare.com

Can a patient be asked to leave a memory care facility due to aggression, anger, and other bad behavior with no notice?

Follow
Share

My dad was finally put in a memory care facility on 11/06/2014, seventeen days later he was sent by them to a Psych Ward Hospital to try to regulate his medication and find out why he so aggressive. He was told he would stay there anywhere from 2-3 weeks to a month. My mom was told she had to pay the full month fee of $5500. for the month of December for the facility. She did, but about 5 days later she was told they were returning her check and did not want my dad back in their facility. Can they do that without any notice. What do we do with him once he gets out of this psych ward?.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
31

Answers

Show:
1 2 3 4
Oh my what a stressful situation....for everyone. I know when I have visited facilities, there were places that my parents could not wait to leave because of a certain overbearing resident. If it is not a palatable environment, pretty soon customers will shop elsewhere, and residents will want to move out (if the problem isn't resolved) and the facility management is keen to resolve problems quickly. Yes I did refer to the outbursting patient as a problem, because in a facility everyone becomes qualitified, according to their needs, they have to make decisions on levels of care, and facilities want to balance the level of care "mix" with their staffing requirements. So if there is one person who's off the charts with their needs, they are going to have a very hard time meeting everyone's needs, safely. Thus the imperative to have those patients evaluated for different or more medications. Are there any treatments such as brain stimulators or implants, to help curb the outbursts? Would seem to be a worthwhile endeavour.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I imagine it's different in state to state, but the same happened to a friend of mine's husband here in Arkansas. Moving him to the hospital was the step they had to take to get him out of their facility. If they might have been able to get him under control at the hospital easily with medication, it was up to them if the wanted to take him back. However, they are not a jail with guards to help keep the other "inmates" safe from out of control prisoners, nor are they required to. They have an obligation to all their other patients as well as thier employees and an out of control adult male can, and often is, a threat to the safety of other patients and to themselves so they are, at least in Arkansas, allowed to choose not to take him back from the hospital.

You definitely want to contact your local department on aging and get some suggestions. is better equipped to deal with more difficult patients. Also work closely with the doctors where he is at to see if there are medications they can prescribe that will make him more manageable at home if he should have to go home with your mom, or at least manageable enough to be able to get him accepted at another nursing home?

My heart goes out to you and your family. This is a difficult situation, without a doubt. For you and for those at the nursing home who would like to help but who's hands are tied. Good Luck.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I would try calling your local ombudsman agency. They advocate for residents of skilled care facilities, and can advise you of patient rights in your area.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Get Adult protective services involved at once. They will get him placed or find home help & call the PCP~~Merry ho ho ho~Is he a Vet?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Samara I don't see anything in your post that would suggest that dementia patients showing aggression don't deserve good care - not at all. You're saying that dementia patients in memory care deserve protection from others' aggression, no? Nothing controversial about that, I'd have thought.

I am hoping that the OP will come back and tell us what her father's psychiatric unit recommended for his ongoing care. This is such a nightmare for anyone it happens to, and so hard to manage. You can't sedate an aggressive dementia patient, you can't disproportionately restrain him, you can't reason with him - what are you supposed to do? I hear a lot of criticism about the inadequacies of provision but very few constructive ideas. It's desperate.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Missmacintx...what a question, I'm not an OR resident, and I my self may feel as you, not wanting to be incredibly burdensome for my kids (or nurses), but please keep in mind, what a slippery slope euthanasia is. If some "elect" to ask for assisted suicide, it's just a nudge away from a societal or medical "expectation" that anybody of any age who for whatever reason is undervalued by future unknown standards they will "have to" kill themselves or be seen as the biggest problem. Instead of finding better medicines & laws to usher people into Heaven we should find better medicines & people to hold their hands while they slip into Eternity. It can be done if we decide that all lives matter. My apologies to anyone who read my previous comments and concluded that very aggressive patients were less worthy of care. Everybody deserves good and patient care & consideration.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I want to know if I become a resident of Oregon, can I pre select my own euthanasia if I get unmanageable? I NEVER want ti put my kids through this!!!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

It's a sad thing and there are no easy answers, but aggressive or disturbing behavior in one person can make care and comfort for the other residents almost impossible. I work with adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities and we expect a certain amount of difficult behavior, but when it gets to a point that other clients are not able to focus on their activities and the noise level from the client with behavior issues requires 3 or 4 staff to try to get things calmed down again, the client's family may be asked to find another program. So it's kind of the same thing for a nursing home. This is one reason that nursing home staff may often rely too heavily on sedating medication, but that's not the answer either. I hope and pray you can find a quality care facility that will give your father the care he needs, but can't verbalize. Sometimes I think the difficult behaviors or outbursts stem from emotional or medical needs that are not being met, but that the person doesn't know how to cope with or explain.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

By voiding your contract and returning the money, the AL appears to be saying that they were in error in saying that they could manage your dad in his current stage of dementia. In a way, they've done you a huge favor (I know it doesn't feel that way). They've given you the opportunity to get dad's meds stabilized while under medical supervision and the knowledge and resources of the discharge staff in getting him into a new, better suited facility. Best of luck.

A further tip. My mom is currently in a NH. Each time she goes to the hospital, we release her bed (their suggestion, she's private pay). They have a low census, so it's not a problem for her to be readmited. Saves her quite a bit at $15,000 per month.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I just went through this with my father a few months ago. All good advice here, particularly the comments about not being coerced into taking him home. The hospital will have to keep him until you find a place for him, but the Social Worker at the hospital will put pressure on you to hurry up. Take your time and find the right place for you and your Dad.

Thankfully, we found an Alzheimers/Dementia Care facility (Beaverton, Oregon) that seems better equipped to handle aggressive behavior than the last Assisted Living facility which had added a Memory Care wing as an afterthought.

The right combination of meds seems to be the key. My Dad still yells and curses sometimes, wants to leave (all the time), has crazy delusions, etc. but just not as severe. The doctor is still slowly tweaking his meds, trying to get the anti-psychotic dose as low as possible. He's been at this new place for two months and hates every minute of it. I feel guility (like most of us), but I know he's safe and I'm grateful the chaos has subsided, at least for awhile.
Take care of yourself - it really wears you down... Hugs!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

1 2 3 4
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions