Parkinson's disease - How do you slow down the process? - AgingCare.com

Parkinson's disease - How do you slow down the process?

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my aunt is suffering from pd , she is 57 years old , disease is diagnosed only year back .. But she started shivering , shaking from 6 months .. She is on insulin from past 8 years due to diabetics .. I love her so much .. I need some advice how we can slow down the process .. Already she is feeling depressed as she is not able to do daily chores properly due to her trembling and shaking of hands and body .. I know I cannot get her to normal but I desperately want to know how can I improve her condition .. Please help me------ deepu

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My husband is on meds, and the difference is significant. The docs often start people on dopamine agonists (mimics dopamine as opposed to replacements like l-dopa), then transition to l-dopa when the agonists no longer work. There are also meds like Azilect, which is a neuro protector.

Depression is understandable, especially at her age. This is where she needs to be candid with her neurologist so she can address this. For your part, try to find normal things she can do - when my husband was in the early days and the meds hadn't kicked in yet, simple things like getting out and going to breakfast helped.
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Here are some good videos on how diet can impact Parkinson's.

nutritionfacts/?s=parkinson%27s+disease
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The Parkinson's affects brain, and that affects muscle in throat, which mean some patients can't swallow properly, and they decline a lot after that level of involvement. They might do stomach or nasogastric tube feeding but the doctors said in my relative's case it would overload the body with fluid, and with a heart weakened by lack of exercise (due to Parkinson's affecting gait & coordination) that would risk heart failure. So in their case they died from the Parkinson's, if they had not had Parkinson's they would probably be alive today.
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You don't die OF Parkinson's disease you die WITH Parkinson's
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One of my relatives, and 2close neighbors died from Parkinson's. It is very progressive, even with the "best" doctors and medicines. Please know there are many others experiencing this dread disease. Research is happening, maybe some day some effective treatment. Right now not much will be very effective, eventually people become truly disabled from the disease, and it is terminal.
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Some people with Parkinson's report improvement using the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. Try researching it. There's plenty of information available on YouTube. Note: therapeutic ketosis is not the same as ketoacidosis. The former is beneficial. The latter is not. Most conventional doctors are familiar with the latter, which is a danger for Type I diabetics. Your aunt is most likely a Type II diabetic. In her case, nutritional ketosis would most likely be beneficial. She'd just have to be willing to drastically cut down on her carbs. Best of luck to both of you.
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Know that it is a progressive disease and specialists are needed for all the symptoms which are numerous and varied; become her advocate and get help from her doctors, and all the wonderful people who are researching to find ways to stop the disease in its track...pray all the time; it is a tough road ane the patient and caregivers need constant support
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Parkinson's disease is a depletion of dopamine in the brain. Why isn't she taking L-dopa? You do not mention her on any medication other than insulin. Her amount may be too little or too much depending on how much dopamine is in the brain. Get her checked out by a neurologist and endocrinologist.
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Hi, My husband has had Parkinson's disease since 1997. He started with a tremor on his right side. It's extremely important that she gets on Parkinson's meds. If possible get her into a Movement Disorder Neurologist. If she is not able to function that can also do Deep Brain Stimulation (DBP) which is a wonderful and helps them to return to a "normal" existance.
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Also find a Movement Disorder Neurologist for her to see regularly. It makes all the difference.
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