Both parents with stage 5 Alzheimer's, nest egg will cover facilities expenses, But NOT on a month to month basis. Any suggestions?

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The facility want all assets transferred. A justified request you would think. Assets exceed $1M. Now it's gets sticky with the Facilities contract fine print, which states If the patient becomes uncontrollable or condition exceeds their ability to care (their decision) the patient may be discharged and /or evicted. This could be a Baby Ruth Bar in a swimming poolif things go south. WELL THATS MY NIGHTMARE AND I'M GETTING STABBED WITH IT..... ANY SUGGESTIONS perferrably Legal. Thanks Marc T.

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Your parents have worked a lifetime to provide for themselves and their family. Without a plan for care, their life savings will rapidly dwindle down.

You didn't explain the type of facility they are entering, but the admissions office of a facility does not represent the patient's financial interests.

The level of assets you did mention requires that your parents have legal representation in the process of admission, so that they, and you, can understand the options, and be aware of the resources available. If you are designated as a fiduciary for your parents under a Power of Attorney document, you cannot dismiss the duty to protect their interests.

Privately paid nursing home rates are higher than rates paid by Medicaid, which may be available with proper planning. You may be surprised to learn of the options that crisis planning can open up.

You mentioned that you feel like you are enduring a nightmare now. By consulting an elder law attorney in your state, you can open your eyes to the solutions available.
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I'm assuming that you have POA. What you do is you consult an eldercare attorney (sing your parent's money) to sort this out.

Is this a memory care AL that specializes in dementia? Do they have a geriatric psychiatrist on staff who can consult in cases where the patient becomes combative or abusive? Does either of your parents have an underlying medical condition that might cause them to need NH, rather than AL care?
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Mom's facility withdraws from her bank account. I have conservatorship. I am responsible to ensure funds are withdrawn and placed in the bank account. I manage her funds with the help of her financial advisor. Fortunately all of her funds list my brother and me as beneficiaries. Her nest egg still makes money as she ages. If you are not on their accounts then you may want to seek an attorney to gain conservatorship. It may take a month or 2 and some footwork. The expenses can be charged to her estate. You can also ask the attorney about the nursing homes request. 
As far as the fine print does either of them have an issue of being out of control? If yes, then shop around. There are places that handle this situation.  Again a legal professional can help with the fine print. 
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I think what that means and assuming by facility you mean an AL vs a NH. AL living requirements often reflect the person's level of function - they are assessed to be able to perform ADL's with minimal assistance from the AL staff. Once their disease progresses they may need a higher level of care than an  AL can provide. Thus the AL will ask the family move the person to a skilled 24/7 facility which is then a NH. I can't speak to the financial aspect but don't think the AL will keep access to your parent's money if they are discharged and transferred to a skilled 24/7 provider. 
AL staffing cannot support care for patients needing more extensive monitoring, medical conditions, mobility deficits. With their assets however you may be able to augment the AL staffing with private pay aides while they are in AL but I am unsure as I don't know the AL's policy as each can be different. 
Again Finances are not my forte but forum members here are very well versed in those.
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