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My mom suffered a stroke and then received a diagnosis of slowly progressive dementia this year. My...(our) issue at present is mobility. She has all but given up walking or moving but has no trouble getting out of bed in the middle of the night and sleeping on the padded mat next to her bed. I am puzzled because she seems to be immobile but has no trouble placing herself on the floor. I have a Hoyer lift for her so I can get her up but as soon as i leave the room she is back on the floor. I hope some one in this group might shed some light on what I believe is puzzling behavior.

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We use two of these and onewith a pocket for tissue, water bottle, pain meds, etc.
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My MIL had a small strokes 2 years ago. Since then she is less steady on her feet. She always uses her walker and we put a nice tray on it so she does not need to worry about carrying items like dishes, clothes, whatever.

We use lots of grab bars and 3 bed rails - small ones - one of each side of bed near her head and one at the foot of the bed on the side where she gets up atnight. We us a commode near bed for nighttime pit stops and safety bars around toilet area and on walls nearby - We mount them here and there - so that she can easily grab them as she walks around. - in the bath, near toilet, near shower, etc. Just notice where they 'touch' as they walk around - at our house we can 'see the oil from her fingers' on the walls, furniture, etc. That's where we install a bar.

If they know they have something to grab onto - they feel safer and may stay mobile longer. We just use those smaller 12'' bars. It does helps. Mount them at whatever angle is best for them.

We know there will come a time when this does not work - but for now - it keeps her safe.
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Thanks Friendlybedguy

I will be in touch
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Marie- you are using the Hoyer for floor pickups which is a great idea to save your back. Is your mother OK for repositioning and getting in/out of bed? I attend many tradeshows and would be glad to talk to you (and anyone else) about mobility items on the market to reduce risk of injury to person and caregiver. You should be able to find me via my profile.
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Friendlybedguy,

I think you are on to something. In the recent past I would find her out of her bed and safely on the floor.

When I tried to get Mom up she resisted. I purchased a Hoyer Lift which gave me the final say in getting her off the floor.

Mom has a strong walker so I will give it another try.

Thank you.
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I will throw something out in case it applies. Sometimes an elderly person (especially with muscular issues like MS, Parkinsons, etc) will no longer trust their own body and feel safe on the floor or if another person is in control. I hate to see a person get to a point of being slinged because they don't use their muscles and will go downhill from there- the more they can help themselves the better off they will be. If they had sturdy assistive devices to help them they may be more capable to help themselves and reduce risk of injury to themselves and caregiver. AbleData has lots of items- check out superpoles, Friendly Beds, etc.
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Hi Marie16, my FIL is going through the same thing. He has had several mini-strokes (which I am guessing are different from your moms) and he has slight dementia. He claims he cannot walk but was found wandering around in his room. He is in rehab at this time and we have been told that he works with the physical therapists and has even gotten to where he will walk 150 feet with assitance but when he goes to his room, he wants the nurses or my husband to carry him everywhere. He is approx. 180 lbs. and 6 foot and depending on the nurses, it sometimes takes two people. It is all my husband can do to budge him because sometimes he is dead weight.
They are requesting some tests to be done on my FIL's legs this week to see if there is any reason he cannot use them (e.g. blood flow, etc). If those tests come back okay then we are guessing it is psychological.
They told my husband that if my FIL's comes home, he will have to be watched/helped 24/7. So, now the only option for us is a long-term care facility.
Good luck with your mom.
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I just read the thread through. I should have done that to start with. There are no suggestions there that go beyond what you are already doing. I guess that we are in the dark about the behavior, too. But we do know that you are not alone in dealing with the strange behavior.
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All right! The link works... at least is does for the moment. :)
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There was another person who asked about the same thing on the group. Usually links don't work so well on the group. If it doesn't work, you can try cutting and pasting. I've never had this problem, so I don't know what I would do. Maybe this thread will give some ideas. https://www.agingcare.com/questions/grandmother-lying-on-floor-cant-lift-her-156985.htm
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I guess there isn't an answer to this question.
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