Anyone experience, a parent with Dementia eating fuzz off their clothes?

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I just bought my mother all new sweat shirts and tops, suddenly I realized they all have holes, some are the size of dimes. There are as many as five holes in some of her tops. Why is she eating fuss off her bib, fuss off the table and biting and pulling the strings on her tops and leaving holes. She is in memory care and If I tell her to spit it out, she will spit the fuss out in my hand, Im worried this can hurt her. Any ideas to why she is doing this. Thank You

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My dad will eat random fuzz and strings he comes across. I don't think it's due to dementia, though, and it sounds like your mom is eating quite a bit more of it than my dad does. Dad will eat lint off of his clothes, or even the floor, but he doesn't chew holes in his clothes. For my dad, it seems to be an OCD type behavior. Did your mother have any OCD tendencies prior to onset of dementia?
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I really have no idea. But I agree with your worry that swallowing a dime-size piece of sweatshirt poses choking risks!

Is there anything else she can have in her mouth that might satisfy her chewing urge? Could she chew gum? (Might also be a swallowing risk -?) Would a sucker appeal to her? They actually make pacifiers for adults! I think they are mostly used as a joke, but there are claims they help prevent snoring. I think I'd be willing to try that for my loved one (or even for myself if I suddenly got the urge to gnaw my clothing). An interesting textured teething ring also comes to mind.

Sweatshirts are so comfortable and easy to put on and come in nice colors so they are a good choice for a care center resident. But I wonder if it would help to try sturdier fabrics for a while, until this problem passes. You might find something in active sportswear departments, such as a nylon running shirt.

Does your mother wear dentures? Could they be removed except for meals? (Not good if it would effect her ability to communicate.)

Just about any strange behavior shows up in dementia. I haven't heard of this particular one. Do let us know what you try and how it works. We learn from each other!
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soulfulgirl, I am moving your post back to the beginning of the line... hopefully someone will be able to give you an answer.
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