Does anyone have a parent or spouse with Dementia who also is on oxygen? - AgingCare.com

Does anyone have a parent or spouse with Dementia who also is on oxygen?

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I have a miracle story to share but I first need to know if any of you have a loved one who has been on oxygen therapy.

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Thanks for the update, Dunwoody101. Sorry it wasn't more completely positive.
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OK, based on my original post, I thought lack of oxygen was a factor in my mom's dementia. But she still has good days and not so good days, but her awareness and memory has definitely improved. Now for the bad news. As she has become more aware of her elderly, dependent state, I've seen an increase in her depression. And also she fights me more on stuff. Jeez, YOU JUST CAN'T WIN WHEN DEALING WITH THIS CRAP. Some people don't know why they drink. I do.
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xbella, who knows? But I would expect that oxygen is only going to improve things if insufficient oxygen is the case of the impairments.

A cpap machine (which is not oxygen) made a huge difference in my life. But I clearly had sleep apnea, as determined by standard tests. Someone who had similar symptoms to mine but who did not have sleep apnea would not benefit from wear that cumbersome mask. Good solutions only work when they are applied to the right problems.
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My friend's Mom has advanced dementia and is 91. Would some oxygen help her you think? Even with alittle bit of xanix she doesn't rest well at night and has been talking very nervously in her sleep, asking God to help her, and other sentences that may or may not make sense. I'm looking for some advice in order to relay back to her and then I read this. I mean, maybe alittle bit of oxygen won't do anything but I thought to ask you anyway.... maybe? (btw, she 'doesn't' have a problem with her breathing, if that helps to know). "TY!"
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That is awesome Dunwoody!!! I hope it keeps up!!! My Mom has vascular -. But not COPD or any other breathing issues. But I wonder.... I would piss on a spark plug if it worked ( sorry-Movie quote-"Wargames")

I really really hope your Mom has future success with the oxygen. Please keep up updated!
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man that incredible and i hope it helps your household burden. a deal is a deal so yes my dementia patient uses o2 only when she feels like she cant breathe well. ( usually manic anxiety ) . her bipolar is more troublesome than dementia right now. the severity of dementia symptoms are rather cyclical too but still hope the o2 helps you guys.
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Wow! I, too, sincerely hope that this restoration of cognitive functioning is permanent (as long as she stays on oxygen). Is she willing to use it this time around?

A person on oxygen could have Vascular dementia or Dementia with Lewy Bodies or Alzheimer's or any other kind of dementia. The oxygen would not cure those disorders. But if the cognitive decline were due to insufficient oxygen reaching the brain (and I know nothing about that) then, well, I guess getting enough oxygen would be the cure. I certainly hope it is in your mother's case.

I wonder if Mom had had a thorough workup by a geriatrician or a dementia specialist when she first began to decline if this would have been discovered then?

We are going to be eagerly awaiting the next installment!
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OK, here's the deal. My mother has suffered from dementia for several years now. As expected, it has progressed. She was never formally diagnosed. Rather, her GP told me based on his experience it was Alzheimer's, and she certainly exhibited the classic symptoms we all know too well. I've lived with her for two years now and have personally witnessed her decline. The only thing she has remained capable of was attending to her bathroom needs, and I figured it was only a matter of time before she no longer could do even this. Everything else needed to be done for her. Like others with this condition, she did crazy stuff, ranging from putting soup in a bowl and then placing the bowl directly on the stove burner to using the kitchen sink drain as a coffee filter to never remembering what I told her even five minutes earlier. One week ago she took a bad fall. I took her to the local emergency room and she only suffered bruises. But upon checking her oxygen levels, they found her reading way below normal and we put her on oxygen. My mom has moderate COPD from smoking as well as life long mild asthma. A Pulmonary specialist put her on oxygen years ago to use just at night. She didn't like the tubing and returned the unit. It has now been one week since her fall and being put on oxygen throughout the day and night. The ER doctor said it would take one week of constant oxygen for her levels to return to normal. Today has been exactly one week and it appears a miracle has occurred. I don't want to count my chickens before they hatch, but her memory, awareness, personality and humor have returned by at least 80 percent. It's like she has awakened out of a coma. Prior to this she existed in an almost zombie-like state. My girlfriend and I are in shock. The change is incredible. Whether it lasts, we do not know, and while oxygen deprivation may not be the cause of dementia for many victims, it is worth checking out with your loved ones. And yes, my mother has been for years on Advair, Spiriva and other inhalers to help her breath, but these medicines do not deliver oxygen to the brain, and had no effect on her mental capacity. Even if one in a hundred find this to be the cause of their loved one's dementia, it is worth checking out. I pray that this is not temporary, but it is too early to tell. All I know is, it feels like a miracle after years of living in hell.
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I met a wonderful lady yesterday who was on O2. I'll relay your story to her. (tap foot, waiting for miracle story)
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Mother isn't on oxygen therapy, but has had to start doing a nebulizer because of difficulty breathing... does that count?
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