My parent in an ALF is now requiring more medical skilled nursing, but under a contract for 60 days. Advice? - AgingCare.com

My parent in an ALF is now requiring more medical skilled nursing, but under a contract for 60 days. Advice?

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My mother has been on Dialysis for 5 yrs and is on insulin and found out just recently that a Registered Nurse needs to administer. There is no Registered Nurse only a CNA and Pharmacy Tech. Because my moms health has declined dramatically. I am currently trying to get her a better Skilled Nursing Facility and the Assisted Facility is telling me you have to have a written notice 60 days prior to moving her. My mom is passing blood since April of this year and I took her to the Dr 3 times and she has also ended up in the ER 5 times this year 2015. All I am concern with is my moms health and they are holding this contract over my head and I have to pay for 60 days of the contract. My question is am I going to be liable because I remove my mom to a Medical Facility to better fit my moms needs?

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Read her original lease agreement. They can no longer meet her needs. Her decline in health should be her ticket out. They are being difficult. What if she fell and broke a hip and had to go to the NH? 60 day notice then?
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Oh, Lynn, we had a similar problem with my dad, dementia, and dialysis - had a hard time finding anywhere for him as well
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Mom is on Dialysis and it makes her very weak...she also have dementia and I think she not capable of understanding, that she would be able to give herself insulin. When I mentioned about putting mom in a Medical facility with skilled nursing and then all compassion was stopped...but was told you have a contract of 60 days...also I have documentation of them not bathing my mom for 5 days...She has been bathed when I show up and find her in soiled clothing and I was assured they were bathing and changing her depends on schedule. I also found that they were taking my mom to the bank to cash checks of $523.00 worth in a 2 week period & when I questioned this...I was met with a answer saying I dont know what your mom does with your money...this is why I am trying to remove her because this facility has taken advantage of my mom and her memory loss...I trying to remove her immediately...but do to her dialysis, it has been a nightmare to figure out where to go...
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wondering about the insulin as well, or is it the dialysis?
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Maybe you should give notice now, so the clock starts running on the 60 days while you find a better placement for her. Also, if you can't get out of the notice, see if there is at least a vacancy credit that would reduce the amount your mom owes. When my mom was in rehab she was given a vacancy credit since she was not using any of their services and they didn't need to feed her.
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Wonder why an RN. People give themselves their insulin.
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Read ALL the applications and ancillary papers signed on admission and see if there are escape clauses such as emergency medical decline, or something similar to that. Also see if you can find anything that addresses your situation, such as needing a higher level of care which the AL can't provide.

You might also ask the physician treating her for kidney issues to write a letter stating that she immediately needs a higher level of treatment, such as (enumerate the issues) ...then specify what the skilled nursing facility has that the AL doesn't have.

You could also ask how the AL facility plans to provide these immediately needed services, switching the burden to them to justify why you should have to stay if they can't meet her needs.

If they still fight you, see if you can find an ombudsperson or agency in the area to help you, or hire an elder law attorney just for that one issue.

Good luck - it's unfortunate the AL management is sticking to the legalese when there's a medical necessity for higher level of care.
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