Can my elderly parent be forced to move out of her home?

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My mom wants to continue living alone at her home of 53 years; she is 93 and in good health for her age. My sister disagrees and thinks she should move. Can my sister force my mom to move? I don't believe in forcing anyone to do anything. What are the steps (legally) to force mom out of her home? This is urgent. Thanks!

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Well, can you hvae someone check in with your mother on a daily basis? Can you hire a caretaker about 8 hours a day? Can your sister move in with her? HOme care guide on this site may have answers
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Why would you want to force her to move at her age if she is reasonably healthy? My mother-in-law is 86, lives alone, still drives and seems more like she is 76. She does forget sometimes, has slowed down a little, but she feels safe in her surroundings. Older people don't adjust to change very well. As long as she is able, let her live there instead of creating more problems. If her health or mental state decline, then it would be time to consider other options. She may become like a different person (depressed, confused, etc.) if you move her. It may be too much for her and the rest of the family if she is forced from her home.
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CHECK OUT LOCAT ADULT ASSISTED COMMUITIES. - SEVERAL OF THEM TAKE MOM WITH YOU. NOTHING RIN WRITNIT YET.
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Just quickly checked a previous post in which you asked a question about the sisters named in a DPOA. First sister had health problems, second sister wasn't financially responsible.

Has that changed, and if so, is the second sister now holding that authority? Also, has there been any declaration of incompetency that would allow her to act with DPOA authority?

Assuming:

(a) the ill sister still holds the authority,

(b) the irresponsible sister hasn't made any false allegations or brought in APS,

(c) your mother holds title to the house, either solely or with either your ill sister or you, but not the irresponsible sister, and/or

(d) the house is in liveable condition, isn't a health or safety hazard, subject to foreclosure, or similar issue,

(e) your mother doesn't owe this sister any money or debt on the house which the sister could call (accelerate),

(f) your mother isn't a hoarder,

Then I don't see how she would have any legal authority to force your mother to move out.

Is there some reason why your sister is pursing this action?

As to the steps to legally force your mother out, I would think that this sister would have to have some legal interest in the house (via title), hold some debt over your mother that she could call, or have some legal interest that would allow her to evict your mother.

If the house is unsafe for any reason, though, that could be a basis for bringing in APS, but there should be an allowance of time for the condition to be remedied.

Since you're really concerned about the legal method of forcing out your mother, it would help to share more of the reasons behidn this sister's intent.
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My mother worked in her hair salon that Daddy built in our garage until she was 98. She lived alone and was fine until she had a stupid doctor miss a diagnosis of hyperthyroid she went into a downward spiral and was forced to retire and move in with me due to a stroke as a result of the hyperthyroid then congestive heart failure. She even mowed her own grass up until that time. I say as long as she's healthy tell sis to take a hike.
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What is *good health* for someone in their mid-90's? My Mom is 96 and she is in what I consider good health for her but I still lie awake at night worrying about her and Dad still living in their own home. I am trying to get my parents to think about moving some place more elder friendly, and do it now so that THEY can decide where to live next.

You never know what will happen next week or next month, and then everyone is scrambling to put one or the other into assistant living and winding up in a facility not of their own choosing.

It's tough, and the answer is *no* you can't force someone out of their own home as long as they are mobile, of clear mind, and not in any danger of hurting themselves. Only thing your sister can do is recommend retirement homes and maybe one home might spark an interest. Think about all the new best friends she would have :)
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No, your sister can't force her to go anywhere. BUT if Social Services determines she unsafe, they can get a court order to move her. OR if sis is the GUARDIAN, she can place her in safe custody.
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