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Jerry's home health nurse practitioner just left. She immediately recognized in Jerry what I have suspected; she recommended palliative care. The nurse practitioner also said that hospice would also be appropriate, because she does not expect Jerry to live longer than another six months.
Jerry knows none of this and neither does his sister or his estranged daughter. Does anyone have experience with palliative care?

Have the evaluation done for Hospice. If he qualifies for Hospice ..great. You will get a LOT of help and equipment and supplies. If he does not yet qualify for Hospice accept Palliative. You will have help and some limited services compared to Hospice but the staff will be observing for signs of decline that would enable them to change the status to Hospice eligible and then you would get all the help and services that Hospice can provide.
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i have had experience with both palliative care and hospice with my late mom with Alzheimer’s who lived with us. We were having a Drs office that provided home visits by a nurse practitioner that was a wonderful way for them to see the ‘true’ mom. I reached out to our large non profit hospice here in the Phoenix area for an evaluation but she did not quite qualify. They instead have a palliative program for dementia patients that was absolutely wonderful. They tracked her so they knew when she could transition to hospice. None wore any name tags or identifying shirts so I just always told mom they were from the ‘Drs’ office. Good luck!!
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Whatever they grant you, take it. Both services help. Hospice is just more care, more frequently.
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I thought home health nurse was palliative care. Palliative care will provide a nurse practitioner to come in and take vitals, check the person for anything, and write it down, once a week or every other week, and report to doctor. They will also provide medical supplies as needed. Basically, you do not have to take patient to doctor, they will come to you. This helps especially if they are wheelchair bound.

Hospice, "end of life", will provide a nurse practitioner, a team of people to come in every week, one to bathe the person once or twice a week, a nurse every week, and a religious person of their faith to come in if you want. Hospice is not only for the patient; they are there for the family, you, the caretaker, too. . They will listen and talk as long as you need.

This also means, that they will evaluate the patient every 30 days or so to see if the patient still needs these services.. They can graduate out of these services.. Mom did 2 times, the last time, she went "home".

Mom was on hospice: aunt is on palliative care.

DOCTOR SHOULD REQUEST HOSPICE. THEY WILL EVALUATE AFTER 30 DAYS.
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Plymouth62 Feb 14, 2020
That’s interesting. It sounds like there can be considerable differences amongst palliative care programs across the US. Our palliative program required we go to their office for medical/pain monitoring every 2 weeks. We opted for hospice so we could have them come to the house instead. It’s been a good experience so far, one year later.
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So far as I know, in the international medical community, hospice and palliative care are the same thing. The USA has the 6 month life expectancy requirement for hospice, which seems to be much better funded. Palliative care is the same thing without the time component. For example I have turned down late-years surgery for my back, but I get help from painkillers and occasional sleeping tablets. That’s one type of palliative care, as they help but won’t ‘cure’ me, and I don’t expect to die any time soon. Here end-of-life care is usually called palliative, not hospice, and there is no time limit rule. It’s just words.
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worriedinCali Feb 14, 2020
In the US, it is not a requirement that life expectancy be 6 months.
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I have seen so much benefit from calling hospice in.

If Jerry isn't seeking treatment for what ails him then hospice would help you care for him and provide medical equipment for his comfort, like oxygen, hospital bed, bath aides, skin ointments and other things. He will be able to continue any medications that he is on and if he decides that he wants heroic measures then you fire hospice and go to the hospital. You still have choices.

Some people end up getting better because they are getting the rest and care they need. It doesn't necessarily mean a death sentence, but it is intended to help people that have been diagnosed with 6 months or less to live.

I think palliative care and hospice care are the same thing in some areas. Just taking the fear out of the verbiage used I suppose.
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Vivian711 Feb 14, 2020
I do love your name. Thank you for the sound advice.
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Palliative care is a step away from hospice care. One would choose it when they no longer want invasive testing and surgical interventions but do not meet the criteria for hospice admission. As cwillie said, hospice service and support is far superior. Hospice can be a tough decision but everyone I’ve spoken with says they wish they had started it sooner. Good luck with whatever direction you take.
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It may be that your NP isn’t in a position to recommend Hospice because she can’t do the 6 month assessment herself. She’s pointed you in that direction.
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Vivian711 Feb 13, 2020
I didn't know that! Thanks! I am afraid if hospice is even mentioned, Jerry would balk.
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Going by what I've read palliative care follows more or less the same general principles as hospice without the funding, so the services and equipment provided by Hospice would be superior. Given his prognosis why are you hesitant to opt for hospice?
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Vivian711 Feb 13, 2020
I was not given hospice as an option.
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Yes, In a nutshell, Palliative care provides comfort until the person passes
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