Anyone on here used palliative care and if it helped cut down the number of doctor visits?

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I am so fed up with WAITING on all of these doctor offices to call me back. Parents have multiple problems, so it's not unusual for us to have at least two visits per week. Does Palliative Care deal with the doctors, or does the caregiver still deal with them? I have sat around for two days trying to deal with their offices and they often don't even call you back when they say they will. It takes 25 minutes to just get one office on the phone.
Already worn out from dealing with home repairs, my own health problems and this aggravation is kind of the last straw. I know that PC only comes once a month, so I am wondering if it would make any difference in getting them to come?

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And since it's for pain, maybe your mom would be willing to take it more than other types of meds.
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Livingsouth, since your mom has a lot of pain issues with her bones/joint and anxiety, I'd discuss a med that treats all of that. Has she ever taken Cybmbalta? My cousin, who was disabled with arthritis, before she got dementia, was placed on that medication is it was like a miracle for her. It really worked for her on all of her needs. Of course, all people are different, but I'd inquire. It's for pain, depression and anxiety. There are certainly other options as well.
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I too felt incredible frustration with taking my 95 year old dad to the doctor every 3 months. I started using a convenient urgent care instead and even better now have a group called mobile physicians that comes to the house. Lots of paperwork to fill out to get it but well worth it.
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LivingSouth: Understand this, that palliative care means that it is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical CARE for people with serious illnesses. It focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of a serious illness-whatever the diagnosis.
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For us it took changing doctors to get what my brother and I felt was appropriate care for our Mom age 91 with advanced dementia. The first doctor she had wanted to see her every three months and would always do labs and referrals. This care might have been appropriate care for other 90 year olds without a terminal illness i.e. dementia but it was not for our Mom. We knew Mom was not going to get well no matter how many tests or referrals she had. All we wanted for Mom was to keep her comfortable and as pain free as possible. Having Healthcare Power of Attorney I contacted another doctor explaining Mom's condition and our goal for her health care. He agreed after reviewing her medical records that it was very reasonable and took over her care. Since then life has been much easier. She is on comfort care only. No need for labs or referrals anymore. There was no need for a special "palliative care" group, this was all arranged with just a kind and knowledgeable Family Practice doctor. When it comes time for Mom to be put on hospice care he will arrange that for us.
I would suggest that you determine based on your parents Advanced Directive what you as their healthcare representative feel is appropriate care. Once you decide that, make an appointment to talk with their doctor without your folks being present and explain to him what your care plan goals are. If your goals are reasonable and he doesn't agree then it's time to start looking for another doc. Not all docs are good at end of life care.
There is one thing to understand, if you do not have legal Healthcare Power of Attorney or if your folks have not signed a release of information the doctor and his staff may not be able to discuss your parents with you. That's the law. So, you'll want to be sure you have one of those. It's also important to share your parents Advanced Directive with the doctor so he'll know what their wishes are.
Another thing to remember is that your parents have the right to refuse treatment. That includes lab tests, referrals etc. It's important to remember that in America most healthcare is a business with a goal to make money. Sometimes, we as caring family members have to step in and just say "NO" it's not in my loved one's best interest.
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When I took over my Moms bills, I found she was going to her PCP every two months. At that point,she was only taking cholesterol meds. She could not give me a reason why. I went with her the next visit and he asked her why she was there and I said because u told her to be here. See its a Medicare thing. They paid for all those visits. A nurse in the office, who is a friend, asked why Mom was there again. She told me she didn't need to be there unless time to renew her meds or for a real medical thing. In NJ, you need to see a physician every six months to renew perscriptions and even then it depends on the med. I would question why the need to go that much. If its just to check vitals, maybe they could have a visiting nurse agency come to u house saying ur parents are primarily homebound. (Which they r if ur the transportation). I would ask if they really need to see certain doctors. Elderly parents don't ask these questions. I'm going to ask a doctor if we can go for a yr instead of every six months. Same with meds. Mom is always put on additinal meds when in the hospital. One was for rapid heartrate from thyroid. Once the thyroid was under controll, she didn't need it but was still taking 2 pills a day. I questioned it and the Dr. weaned her off. If I had said nothing, she would still be on it. So, I would go over her meds.
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If Medicare will pay for a quarterly 'well' visit that's exactly what the Dr will suggest. So much of testing and scheduling is just because Medicare pays for it no questions asked. It would be helpful if another family member went along to the Dr's appointment, heard what was actually said, and then make a determination of necessary or just a money grab.
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I agree that something for her nerves might help. She has taken Buspirone in the past, so I may have to start her back on that. Otherwise, I think that both of them are just going to have to go into a nursing home because I am exhausted.
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My mom complains about pain more when she is stressed or agitated, since she started on mirtazapine to help her sleep at night she seldom asks for more pain relief.
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My mother has seen a rheumatologist, and all the doctors she sees will only give her the Tramadol. They said that she couldn't take Celebrex because of the blood thinner. She also sees a foot doctor AND has also seen an orthopedic doctor (who could only give her a cream with neurontin in it.) I suppose I could take her back to the Rheum. and see if he could give her an injection.... She does have dementia, and my father has memory problems but no 'crazy talk' so far.

I swear that I have bought about two hundred dollars worth of various pain cream, nerve cream, supplements, anything that I see that might help. She thinks that I am supposed to fix all of this.
My dad is taking a homeopathic anxiety medicine that does seem to help.

Both will not take anything unless I put it out, or stand there while they take it.

Everyone else in my family is in denial about how bad it is. They seem to think that if they just buy them some ice cream or cookies, that it will make everything better. Right.
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