Anyone else dealt with ovaries removal possible complete hysterectomy?

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Elderly woman may have to have complete ovary removal with complete hysterectomy. i'm scared. anyone else older who went through this. i also have adhesions from previous abdominal surgeries. i may need them to cut me open instead of laproscopac. thank you

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k111111 - best of luck to you. If you do end up having a hysterectomy do check out the website Hystersisters before hand. It really is a great site - tons of information, tips, checklist and member input. I can't say enough good about it.

And if it helps at all - my hysterectomy was pretty easy. I was up walking about four hours after surgery, had my catheter removed about 17 hours after surgery- and I was home in my own comfy bed 30 hours after surgery. I had my bedside table stocked with magazines, books, and all kinds of tasty treats - movies qued up and for the first week of recovery lazed around like a pampered princess. You be sure to do the same, okay?
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thank you everyone. i will be having another transvaginal ultrasound in march for ovarian cyst which grew. i will then be seeing gynoncologist after that in march. very helpful answers.
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I realize this is probably breaking a rule here but I'm gonna do it anyway and hope the OP sees it.

Prior to my hysterectomy I found a wonderful web site called Hyster Sisters. Google that and I'm sure you'll find it. It has a ton of useful information and boards similar to here. There is an app that is interactive that is free. You can put in the date of your surgery and it will give you tips and lists of how to prepare, how to make it through as easily as possible and also recovery info. It was very helpful to me.
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Oh, to add to Veronica great list above, get your home cleaned before surgery.   There is nothing more annoying than laying in bed after surgery and noticing the bathroom hadn't been clean, or the room dusted, or your favorite cozy pair of pj's are still in the hamper.   Plus cleaning up the house will help keep your mind off the surgery for awhile.
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Don't worry about your age that is the least of your problems.
Be very sure that the surgery is absolutely necessary. OBGYNs are very quick to do hysterectomies. I don't know why yours is recommended but something like fibroids can be dealt with by other means.
I hear the concern in your post but assume it is because you have to have surgery rather than what has to be done.
Talk with the nurses and ask about the procedure and what you can expect.
Briefly you will go in the day of the procedure having fasted and possibly being allowed to take your morning medications with sips of water. Once you are checked in you will be taken to the prep area and asked to change into a gown. You will be asked some general questions and to provide a list of your medications. It is helpful to write a clear list of these. They will put in an IV and may connect you to heart monitors and an oxygen sensor on your finger. The nurse will check your vital signs. Then you will lie on the gurney till it is time to go to the OR. Whoever came with you is usually allowed to remain with you during this time. You will be visited by the surgeon and the anesthesiologist. You possibly may be given a small sedative in the IV before being moved especially if you are extra nervous. Technicians from the OR will come to transport you to the ER. You will be transferred to the operating table and the anesthetic will be injected into the IV which is the last you will remember till you wake up in the recovery room.
When you wake up you will probably find a catheter to drain your bladder which will remain for a couple of days because there is often difficulty passing urine after pelvic surgery. It will be connected to a drainage bag and should not cause discomfort. Your pain will be controlled by adding pain meds to the IV and soon changed to oral medications, They will allow you ice chips or sips of water and in a few hours diet as tolerated. As soon as you are stable in recovery your companion will probably be allowed to sit with you but they may wait till you get up to your room.
Vital signs will be monitored frequently for the first few hours.
You will probably remain in the hospital for a few days but you will be up and walking around the next day.
I don't know if this is the kind of information you are seeking.
As far as removal of the ovaries is concerned after menopause and often before they are removed to remove any risk of cancer. If necessary replacement hormones can be prescribed.
When you go home it is very helpful to have someone stay with you for a few days. There should not be much pain after you get home but they will send you with a prescription for pain meds. If you are largely going to be alone or with an unhelpful husband it is a good idea to either prepare meals ahead and freeze or buy prepared meals. About all you will feel like doing is getting a drink and making a sandwich to popping a meal in the microwave.
If you haven't recently been ill or hospitalized be aware that the older you get the longer it takes to get back on your feet. Remember you are not 20 anymore so if you are working take all the time you can to recover.
Try not to worry about the upcomming surgery. You really don't need to take much with you. I like to have my computer, reading glasses, toilet bag and cell phone. You may want to add reading material or something else to occupy your time. Good luck I am sure you will be fine and if you need the surgery you will feel much better once it is over.
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k, oh good heavens, someone in their 60's today isn't considered to be elderly :)   Look at actress Meriyl Streep, she is 67, and Sally Field is 70.   Elderly?   Far from it.

I realize any type of major surgery is scary and I don't blame you if you are afraid.   Such surgeries are routine now a days, and you are back up on your feet in no time.

And being in your 60's already, you probably have already dealt with menopause, thus when the ovaries are removed, you shouldn't feel a thing.   Those who are pre-menopause with ovary removal will go into instant menopause.

Just make sure you have someone at home who can take care of you, someone who knows what they are doing.
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I'm not sure what you're asking about - I understand the question but not where you're hoping to go with it.

I was 54 at the time. Last May I had what they called a "complete hysterectomy" but did keep my ovaries. I did so on my surgeons recommendation as even after menopause the ovaries produce a teeny bit of estrogen which is beneficial to the heart - and heart disease runs in my family.

My surgery was about four hours and done vaginally. They were prepared to go abdominally if needed to put in a bladder sling but as it turns out - when my cervix was removed my bladder popped back up into place - which was the best possible outcome and what we were hoping for.

So there you go - everything about my hysterectomy and probably more than you wanted to know!
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Has the doctor explained why this is recommended? Have they offered you any alternatives to surgery? Have they explained what you might expect, recovery, anesthesia, etc.?

I would likely get a second opinion, unless it was an emergency situation. I'd try to confirm that it was necessary and that my surgeon was very experienced and capable.

Do you have cysts? Is that the problem?
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woman in her 60s
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If I may be so bold as to ask, how old is elderly?

I greatly sympathise with your anxieties about this surgery. But honestly the best thing to do is to discuss them with your gynaecologist, and perhaps ask if there is a counsellor on his/her team you could talk things through with.
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