If I outlive my Alzheimer's will I remember how creative, funny and intelligent he was before this? - AgingCare.com

If I outlive my Alzheimer's will I remember how creative, funny and intelligent he was before this?

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Or will I only remember him as he is now?
My husband was an internationally known Art Historian, specializing in Byzantine art, Russian and Greek Icons. He was an inveterate punster. Now, as you who are Alzheimer's caregivers know, he is someone who cannot dial a phone, use his computer, etc. This is not an urgent question, but perhaps some of you have wondered about this, maybe some of you can even answer it. I hate to think of the memory of this delightful man fading and being replaced by the vacant person he is now.

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These responses have all be so helpful and encouraging. My husband also was a gifted photographer and made many photo albums. You have reminded me that he no doubt will enjoy looking at them now and they will be wonderful reminders to me of our life together. Thank you all for your much appreciated responses.
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My dad was a very gifted artist and also an inveterate punster. He was a passionate fisherman and lifelong learner. And one day, about six months after his Alzheimer's diagnosis, he picked up a pen and a drawing pad.....and couldn't draw. Today, we see his passion for fishing in his grandson, his artistic talent in his kids and grandkids, his love of puns is his gift to me. It took my sister and I several years to go thru his drawings but when we did, it was with awe and joy. It takes time but one day, you'll hear a pun or see a piece of art and you think of him, the true man, and smile.
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One of the fun things about my Mom's dementia is that everything is new to her each time she looks at it. She has had her moment of fame as well. She did an excellent job of keeping a scrap book with newspaper and magazine articles. It is now one of her favorite things to look at. And each time, it is new to her. She marvels that she had been successful and written about and her pride shows. Though it is fun for mom and me too, there are many times when I think "here we go again" and of course eye roll included.
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Be SURE to take as many notes as you can when he is reminiscing; make them into stories he can read or listen to. You might wind up with enough to make a book that his family or even a wide audience would enjoy!
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partsmom and terrylack1, you have given me great encouragement. My husband does, indeed still remember the many overseas trips we took together and he seems to enjoy reliving those times. Thank you for your caring help.
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Be grateful for the fact that classic Alzheimer's doesn't take memory all at once; the older memories are retained longer; the newer ones go first. Take the opportunity to get him talking about what he can remember, and make notes, recordings, etc, maybe even see if he can still sketch things from his earlier work. Let him live in whatever time period he still remembers, and don't concentrate on the deficiencies of today. Make a project out of bringing out as much old stuff as possible. My mom's best friend developed AD but I could still have good conversations with her about times when her kids and I were young.
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The people we love that have dementia seem to fade away, they become a different person. This doesn't mean we forget who they used to be, we still love them even though they have changed. It's difficult seeing a loved one forget who we are. While he may not know, you will always have the memories of your time together. A memory book is a great idea.
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My husband died of dementia a little more than two years ago. Believe me, I remember and think about all of our 40 years together, not just the 10 he had dementia!
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Thank you, windyridge and txcamper, for your reassuring answers. Today's reality seems so overwhelming that it seems like that's all I'll ever remember. I appreciate your reassurances that that won't be the case.
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Lots of famous people suffer from Alzheimer's Disease and are not forgotten. Three who come to me immediately are Ronald Reagan, Ann Landers and Glen Campbell. Well, Glen isn't gone yet, but he has quit performing.

I understand your fear though. Even us ordinary people don't want to be forgotten. Maybe you could put together a memory book of sorts. Photos, papers he's written, get the family to write down their memories of him and add those.
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