Is there an agency or organization which will assist you in coordinating care for someone who is in AL? - AgingCare.com

Is there an agency or organization which will assist you in coordinating care for someone who is in AL?

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Not end of life care. Husband has Parkinson's (MSA) and neuropathy so has difficulty getting around. There is some dementia and confusion but he does not want to be moved to a nursing home. How can med distribution, etc. be supervised in assisted living?

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The facility my spouse is in dispenses his meds. Their pharmacy is on the list our Part D supplementary plan covers, so the meds are taken care of. The facility also will transport him to doctors' appointments during designated hours. They will even transport him to another of their facilities in case of hurricane evacuation. I still manage his appointments and maintain adequate supplies of toilet paper, etc. For a fee, they will supply the absorbent drawers, but so far they're cheaper at Kroger. As to memory care, it runs about $1000 more a month than assisted living. Many AL places also have memory care on the premises, so moving shouldn't be that much of a problem.
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I also have to agree that ALs despence meds. Usually, you cannot use your prescription plan. Its all out of pocket. They have their own parmacy.
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Fastrunner, Assisted Living does what you are looking for. Administer meds, laundry, housekeeping, make up beds, prepare meals, etc etc. My Mom was in one for 18 months, the woman in the next room was there 6 years and is still there, my MIL is in AL for 3 1/2 years now. Do a computer search of assisted living facilities near you. Visit one and you will be educated in what that AL does or doesn't do. Take notes. then visit a 2nd one and a 3rd and so on. Each will give you info as to how THEY do things. And you will be able to pick what is right for your husband. I'd suggest a memory care facility as it is very hard to move dementia residents around. So make the move once. Choose a place near family so visits can be often. Good luck
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Talk to the Social Worker at the facility.
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Sorry, husband.
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Did ur parent or you work? Some large companies have help available as a benefit. Call ur office of the aging. I do agree, though that an assisted living doesn't do it all. Aunt was moved when she couldn't walk anymore.
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I don't know which state your are in, but in NC, assisted living facilities administer medication per the doctor's orders. A med tech person does this that works for the facility. Most of them also have physical therapy in the facility, that needs a doctor's prescription. All of the ones that I know, have a nurse on staff who checks the residents weekly. They call you if there is a need to see the doctor. They also transport to the doctor appointments and keep records of the meds, vitals, etc. They will check temp, blood pressure, blood sugar, etc. whenever the doctor says check and keep it in a log book.

The places I know of have whirlpool baths that they can place even a person who cannot walk. They are able to place the resident in his wheelchair from the bed and back, as long as it doesn't require more than one person to assist. They also are allowed to assist with toileting, daily baths, grooming, laundry, etc. I have actually seen some there who are amputees. They will push them to the dining room, but do not feed them.

They also will take those with dementia, but it can't be very severe. I would have someone do a serious assessment regarding his needs and abilities to determine if he needs more than a regular assisted living facility can provide. My loved one had to move to a Memory Care Unit, when regular assisted living was not sufficient. I would be very candid about his memory and any acting out due to dementia. Regular Assisted Living staff are not equipped to deal with it. Especially, if he is not cooperative or has temper problems.

Memory Care Units do all of the things listed above, except they have closer supervision and more hands on care. They are trained to work with dementia patients.
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