What are my options for a loved one with dementia who doesn't have enough monthly income to pay for a memory care facility?

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She makes too much money to qualify for Medicaid or other government programs, and I can't afford to make up the difference between her monthly income and the monthly price of an nursing home facility. What are my options here?

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Also speak clearly with the facility if this memory care has medicaid beds available from day 1 of admission. medicaid is first & foremost done to pay for skilled nursing care in a NH. Often memory care is more like a heightened security AL, so not considered a traditional NH& so not covered by medicaid.
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I'd look into seeing if your moms source of income will qualify under getting a Miller Trust done to deal with the excess income.

I'm assuming that mom has to will shorty have spent down her assets so she's good on the assets part of medicaid. & all your dealing with is too much monthly income, right? For Miller to work, The income needs to be from a "qualified & guaranteed" source like SS, federal or civil service type of retirement.

Basically how a Miller works is: mom gets 1K in SS & 1K in deceased hubs pension & $800 in her retirement. $2800 a mo. BUT moms state has a maximum monthly of $2100. So she makes $700 a mo too too much $. The Miller gets the income and voila! Mom now qualifies for Medicaid. Miller is totally legit but needs to be drawn up by an attorney to meet Medicaid compliance & flexibility. Some states have miller so that all $ goes to NH; other states have it build in a trust by the overage each month which reverts to the state upon death. If her income qualifies, it can be a godsend to get done. Good luck!
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If anyone can assist you it would probably be a social worker.

Do you have a facility in mind? If so, contact their social worker and see if there isn't something that can be done to help your loved one financially.

In my opinion, social workers know everything and are a valuable resource.

(No, I'm not a social worker :) but I've worked with them for years and am in awe of what they can do).

If you don't have a facility in mind go on some tours and pick out the one you think is best for your loved one. The facility and its social worker will help you figure out your loved one's financial situation. They want you business, they have an incentive to help you. If, after all of that, they come to the conclusion that they can't help you it might be time for another plan.
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