Any opinions on surgery on a 94 yr old man in fairly good health?

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Could need a supra pubic catheter and am worried about anesthesia effects.

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I meant to send you good wishes. Caregiving all week and tired, but please let us know how it goes.
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We were lucky and blessed to live near an excellent medical center and the anesthesiologist was wonderful. When dad was 87 he fell and broke his hip requiring hip replacement surgery. I was very worried. He has late onset Parkinson's and contracted aspiration pneumonia in the hospital before surgery and waited for the ok in hospital about a week to get his hip operated on. The procedure went well and he came out of surgery alert. The anesthesiologist explained that he was able to give dad a lighter sedation.
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As I said before, my dad was fine with the procedure, however, they did not anesthetize him into a full sleep. He remained awake or perhaps slightly sedated. I remember it was very minimal as he was very alert. Best wishes for you and your loved one!
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Thanks to everyone for taking the time to answer my question. I will surely ask the urologist and the anesthesiologist for their final answer about surgery. I will say, that last time I saw my Dad he said "that he we will have the final decision on what to do and that this is no way to live with this pain". For that reason alone I guess I would agree to do it if the docs ok it. I certainly want him to be as comfortable as he can be and this is just one area that he still complains about the most.
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I forgot to mention this - I would be careful about using anesthesia on the elderlies. You don't want to be unpleasantly surprised with the outcome. I agree, that it really depends on the individuals - if they come out of surgery fine vs. coming out confused and that becomes their new norm.
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On my first surgery here at my hometown, I saw the anesthesiologist when he walked in right before my surgery. Took one look at my chart and didn't like that I was having a rapid heart beat. He wasn't going to do the operation until he received my echocardio results. Surgeon walked in and was surprised that I wasn't prepped. Told him what the anesth doc said, he said that there is no problem with my heart.

My second major surgery was in Hawaii at the children/women's hospital. I had to come in the night before my surgery to be interviewed by the anesth. doctor. Oh my gosh, he was old! While he was taking notes, his hands were shaking. All I kept thinking was - an anesthesiologist with Parkinson-like shaking hands is going to do my anesthesia?!? Well, it's obvious I survived that surgery.

As you can see, 2 separate hospitals - with the same major abdominal surgery - with different procedures regarding the anesthesiologist.
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I thought it was PROTOCOL that anes. docs assess patients prior to surgery. ESP in the elderly! My DIL is an amazing anes doc, and I really appreciate her input when we have issues with Mother. She saw Mother at Christmas, then when mother wanted a 2nd hip replacement, DIL freaked out---said I had to intervene, that mother was a terrible candidate for general anes. and should never have it again in her life (unless her overall health should greatly improve). No worries, mother's GP nixed that surgery and any others. (I have to add that Mother "planned" to die while under anes.....so she said). She said there are MANY ways to keep a patient comfortable and yet still do a lot of procedures. People just don't know enough to ask.
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Midkid, how wonderful if anestheiologist would assess a patient first. Is that assessment done days before scheduled surgery or in the pre-op area. Whenever I have had a procedure done I don't meet the anestheiologist until right before the procedure.
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A supra pubic cath can be placed with just a local anesthetic and maybe something like Versed to "calm" the patient. Mother had one placed in the drs office. I didn't even know she was having it done. It has helped her incontinence and UTI's tremendously. If no general anes. is done, the risk is not too great, but you need to ask the dr (esp the anes dr. My DIL is an anes. and she has told me she's refused elderly patients when she assesses them and feels they don't make good candidates for general anes. I am sure she's not unusual in that level of care).
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I agree that's it's a good idea to discuss the risks and concerns with the surgeon and anesthesiologist, but I'm not that confident they really get it. I'm not sure how much they know about anesthesia and dementia. They should, but when I brought it up with them about my cousin, (I'm HCPOA) it was discounted pretty quickly. They said they would use the least amount possible with no general, but then on that day, said general might be necessary. I explained our concern to the surgeon and the anesthesiologist and they didn't seem to get it. I don't think other people read up and research dementia issues like us caregivers do. Even those in the healthcare field. At least that's been my experience. I've witnessed it with Orthopaedic doctors too.
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