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It seems to me that my husband's short term memory is a little worse. I noticed it about a week ago. Today I had to run an errand and I always tell him before I leave that I have just fed the dogs and took them out to potty. When I got home 2 hours later he had fed them again and took them out when I pulled up. This was not necessary as I had done that just before I left. I am concerned but I don't think it is necessary to call the doc. I am scared because this is just the beginning. Diagnosed July 28th last year. Once they lose a little more memory does it ever change for the good or have more brain cells died or does he need an increase of Aericept or Seroquel? I know you can't advise but what has your experience been with this sort of thing ? Thank you




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For me there was significant change for the GOOD; for my mom it was a decrease in memory--at a significant point in the process.

Exactly 15 months ago (she had had problems already for a few years), my mom was furious with me constantly because I hadn't visited "in five days." The truth was that I had been there EVERY DAY. But she didn't remember. This had been going on for about two years and was making me very weary.

Then something happened--her memory slipped just that little bit more that she no longer remembered anything of the recent past at all--not even my imagined absence. This has been wonderful for me. My mom is happy to see me every time I arrive and she doesn't know when she saw me the last time. Am I coming from the ladies room or Louisiana? She doesn't know or seem to care.

This has given her peace of mind and me freedom.
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I don't know what dose of Aricept your husband is on but it might be worth mentioning it. I am hoping the docs have told you that Aricept only works for a while and that long term it will serve no purpose at which time they will wean him off it. If they start to lose more memory sadly more Aricept will not necessarily offer an improvement, and it will depend on the type of dementia too. In my Mums case it is mixed dementia Vascular Dementia (often abbreviated to VaD on here ) and Alzheimers She was started on Aricept about a year ago and they tell me it may have up to about 3 years validity but her memory would not improve it would just decrease more slowly (according to the doc I spoke to she would be about a year better off than she would be without it)

In my experience Pam is spot on. There will be quite lucid days and there will be days when you think ...say whaaaaaaat? The trouble is it isn't always days it can be minutes later. So while you think everything is fine when you leave the house moments later it might well not be but you cannot tell and you cannot beat yourself up for that sort of thing. All you can do is minimise the issues as you encounter them. In the case of the dogs give them half a meal and then if he does give them a second one it won't be too drastic or don't feed them until you get back

I vent on here a lot when the bad days are present or when Social services are neither helpful, caring or providing a service.... I find it helpful if I can get out the frustration and irritability I find within me. It is absolutely normal to be frustrated, it is absolutely OK to be angry, it is perfectly OK to want to go and scream or be tearful - most of us have been there. Some are brilliant carers (past and present so you will benefit from their vast experience), some not so much - I am a not so much one for I whine and moan but others have it far worse than I, BUT I am here and I do care for my mother. On the good days I try to help others on here who are going through the same thing.

This is a fabulous site and while we might not tell you what you want to hear be assured we mean well - we just don't sugar coat stuff that is really important.
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There will be good days and bad days. The bad days become more frequent. So write in a log- date, time, what happened, how long the confusion persists.
This will help the MD track his progress.
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It might help to write it on a white board and leave it next to him when you go out..
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Does it ever change for the good? There are times where you can get around their resistance. moments after my father refuses to do something I can approach him with a fresh slate and have him doing it. If he cannot remember something I need to know about something important he may remember it moments later by asking the same thing in different words after he has forgotten I asked earlier. I can try a different tact almost immediately.
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I don't want sugar coating I want the help you all are giving me. It helps so much. I get up every morning with my coffee and visit with you all. God Bless you all and Big Hugs
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Having a forgetful unfocused husband..I have found jotting down notes for him helps a lot!! And there are medications..that if given early can slow down the progression of dementia....I know that constantly reminding someone can be frustrating and exhausting! Hugs!
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Sometimes making them repeat what you said helps. Ask them what did I just tell you to do. When they repeat it and they hear their own voice it seems to reinforce what you said. May not work in this situation but is worth a try.
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Hi Tarajean, I imagine things will slowly get more difficult but there will be good days as well. That said the particular incident you mention could be just plain absent minded male syndrome (joking). I feel like I'm talking to the wall many times and memory is not the issue in my hisband's case. That said, I myself have fed the dog twice at times. For that particular issue to keep the puppers from packing on pounds maybe if you feed them then pick up the bowls. If the bowls are on the floor, means the dog hasn't eaten. Just a thought. Also a second dog walk can only be beneficial for both. Try not to panic and maybe over think what could be a normal mix up for any of us.
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My step mother forgot that she didn't like me when she got deeper into Alzheimer's. This made it a little easier for my father to reach out to me. The step-mother had issues and policies about who she was going to be nice to: anyone in her own family was a God. Anyone in Dad's family was a demon. After Alzhiemer's everyone was a treat to see and she was happy with anyone.

When things got worse she turned violent and had to go into a nursing home. She's passed on. Now my Dad is getting more Dementia of some kind. But heck, he's 97 now.
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