Objective test for mental state. Any recommendations? - AgingCare.com

Objective test for mental state. Any recommendations?

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My sister and I disagree on the mental capacity of my mom. She lives nearby and I do not. I think my mom will comply with an objective test. Any recommendations for what to use?

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If there is a rehab facility or university hospital, call them and ask to be referred for geriatric neuropsych testing. This generally includes brain imaging, a mental status exam and neuropsychological testing. My mother also thought that this was going to be used to declare her "crazy". I insisted we needed it as a baseline, and boy, am I glad we got her to go. We were able to document what her cognition was before her stroke. It was much easier for the rehab docs to see what was stroke related and what was related to her previously documented cognitive decline.
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For drivers license: When my husband's license expired I was relieved, but the DMV told me he could renew it any time. So I picked up a drivers manual from them and told my husband that he would have to retake the test if he wanted to renew his license. Being unable to comprehend the writing he gave up after 2 hrs - thank God - and I have been his chauffeur ever since.
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The test my mom's GP gave her was like a 7th grade reading comprehension test. Mom failed enough questions she walked away with the dementia label, no instructions for followup, second opinion, further investigation, or how to prepare for the future. She would have gotten more instructions with a case of pink eye. I think it's a HUGE disservice to people to do a half-baked diagnosis and let it go at that. It's like landing on the beach and believing you've conquered the continent.

My unsolicited advice is to maybe start with the GP to get mom to understand they see a problem, then go to a neurologist next. It's a specialty just like any other.

Knowing what I do about the medical care in the community where mom lived then, I'm not surprised though. It's still 1970 there. Mom would never do the kind of proactive research and follow up a dementia diagnosis requires. That's not her personality, and she has no way to do it. If she needed to know, the doctor would tell her, right? I could never move back there.
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her family doctor can do this test.....or you could go to a specialist at any aging center.......
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Do you take her to the doctor, ER, or have home health aids? I would suggest in any of these situations you let your mother answer the questions asked by the medical professionals. Remind them she is the patient to ask her, get it documented. They are to document if she is having trouble thinking or speaking.. WORKED like a charm for me.
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For driver's license: Check your state law. Virginia allows a 1st degree relative to report that their relative is unsafe to drive, and DMV will schedule a driving test for them. DMV will not provide the name of the informant. Another option is to report your concerns to the doctor of the person and ask them to request that DMV take away their license or call them in for a driving test.
Another idea is to report your concerns to the auto insurance company and see if they will cancel the insurance.
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Can you say that the neuro testing is a good idea to make sure she's getting all the benefits she's due from...wherever. I would love to get my mom into a real neuro-psych eval. The name alone makes her noncooperative bcause she's afraid she will end up in a mental hospital. Which she wouldn't with whatever form of dementia she has.
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DMV just gave Dad a new lisc. This is the person who was driving in town with the door open, has had the car in the back yard several times etc. Scary really.
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Use a complete neuro-psych exam conducted by a specialist Neurologist who treats dementia patients. You can expect the patient will refuse to go because they suspect you want to "put them away" forever.
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